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High-End Images Shine at AIPAD

Citing a buoyancy that entered the market with the New Year, dealers said the 25th Photography Show of the Association of International Photography Art Dealers (AIPAD) at New York’s Hilton hotel, held from Feb. 10-13, did a booming business.

NEW YORK—Citing a buoyancy that entered the market with the New Year, dealers said the 25th Photography Show of the Association of International Photography Art Dealers (AIPAD) at New York’s Hilton hotel, held from Feb. 10-13, did a booming business. Dealer Laurence Miller told ARTnewsletter that museums were buying in force and that there were also a lot of transactions between dealers. “It seems the more expensive things are, the quicker they sell,” he observes. Organizers said attendance was about 7,000, on par with levels in previous years.

Among the highlights at Miller’s booth was a 1935 Walker Evans image, Breakfast Room, that fetched “in the range” of $200,000, Miller notes.

Chicago dealer Steven Daiter explains that he chose to focus on André Kertész in order to tie in with a current retrospective at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. He notes that a set of contact prints of distorted images by Kertész had gone to a collector for about $125,000.

Boston dealer Robert Klein, who is also president of AIPAD, says of the fair, “Every year we move up a notch or two and now we are emerging from a sleepy economy, and the appearance of the show is improved vastly.” He told ARTnewsletter that three-fourths of his booth was stocked with contemporary material in order to “reflect the balance” between new and vintage work that gives AIPAD its strength.

Photographers whose work was sold from Klein’s booth included Eugene Atget and Evans; Tom Baril, a contemporary photographer often featured by Klein; and new photographers Arno Rafael Minkkinen and Paul Ickovic. Prices ranged from $7,500 for works by Minkkinen to $30,000 for those by Evans. “There were not a lot of repetitive artists this year,” says Klein. “The booths had distinct personalities and showed a greater confidence in the breadth of the audience.”

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