ARTnewsletter Archive

Prices Are Rising for Terry Rodgers’ Figurative Art

Prices for Terry Rodgers’ complex figurative paintings have risen more than threefold over the past five years, reports Amy Miller, director of Atlanta’s Fay Gold Gallery, which has exhibited the artist’s work three times since 2000. All the shows, the most recent one held last summer, have sold out, even though prices have risen from

NEW YORK—Prices for Terry Rodgers’ complex figurative paintings have risen more than threefold over the past five years, reports Amy Miller, director of Atlanta’s Fay Gold Gallery, which has exhibited the artist’s work three times since 2000. All the shows, the most recent one held last summer, have sold out, even though prices have risen from an average of $7,500 back in 2000 to $17,000 now. “We’ve had to raise prices to curb demand,” Miller told ARTnewsletter. “It hasn’t worked.”

The overall price range for a Rodgers painting is $15,000/28,000, depending upon size. The largest works can reach 6-by-8 feet, while middle-sized pieces may be 60-by-64 inches. Miller notes that she has asked the artist, who is 56 and lives in Columbus, Ohio, for some smaller pieces—around 40-by-50 inches—for the gallery’s next show in May, “just to give a wider price range” for collectors. Smaller works are priced in the $10,000/12,000 range.

Rodgers’ painting style is a highly detailed realism, focusing on people usually in group settings, for example, a cocktail party set in an elegantly furnished room or house. The more recent paintings feature younger, hipper, upscale types—those who are often found at parties consuming substances that may not be legal, talking on their cell phones and scantily clad.

Collectors of Rodgers’ work are a varied group; some of them have invested significantly in a wide range of contemporary artworks, while others have spent a sizable amount solely on the artist’s work, says Miller.

Robert Curcio, a private dealer in Manhattan who has exhibited Rodgers’ work at a variety of international art fairs, characterizes the artist’s buyers as couples generally “living comfortably,” some of whom see reflections of their own lifestyle in Rodgers’ subject matter.

No one gallery represents the artist, though he has exhibited most often with Fay Gold and, overseas, with the Torch Gallery, Amsterdam, and Marella Arte Contemporanea, Milan. Rodgers averages two shows a year at various galleries, with about ten paintings in each one. There does not appear to be a secondary market for his paintings at present. Says Miller: “Our clients are so in love with the works that they won’t sell them.”

  • Issues