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For AIPAD a Good Show Despite Snow and Other Distractions

The annual Photography Show of the Association of International Photography Dealers (AIPAD) “went very well for most people,” says New York dealer Spencer Throckmorton, who specializes in vintage and contemporary Latin American works.

NEW YORK—The annual Photography Show of the Association of International Photography Dealers (AIPAD) “went very well for most people,” says New York dealer Spencer Throckmorton, who specializes in vintage and contemporary Latin American works.

This year the fair moved to the Seventh Regiment Armory on Park Avenue, and saw an increase in visitors from Feb. 10-12 despite a 26-inch snowfall on the final day of the fair.

Dealers say business was good, even though many collectors were preoccupied with Sotheby’s sale of works from the Metropolitan Museum of Art later in the week. Throckmorton reports that his gallery sold works ranging from $500/25,000, including three prints of the same image by contemporary Mexican photographer Flor Garduño.

Attendance ran to an estimated 8,000 people, up about 1,000 from previous years when the exhibition was held at the midtown Hilton hotel, AIPAD executive director Kathleen Ewing told ARTnewsletter.

Boston dealer Robert Klein, who is president of AIPAD’s board, feels that relocation to the Armory had a strong effect on the turnout of fresh faces. “Groups of people from the Park Avenue neighborhood came in,” Klein says, noting that he “sold contemporary works, at prices ranging from $2,500 to over $100,000,” by Lajos Geenen, Bill Jacobson and Arno Rafael Minkkinen; and vintage prints by Eugene Atget and Harry Callahan, among others.

The most expensive work to sell at the fair was a $750,000 Edward Weston picture of a shell from the stand of the Weston Gallery, Carmel, Calif.

New York dealer Hans Kraus Jr. brought a selection of mid-19th-century works as well as pictures by late 19th- and early 20th-century photographers Alvin Langdon Coburn, Frederick Henry Evans and Edward Steichen, selling “a few things for $3,000” and several pieces ranging from $15,000/120,000.

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