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Strong Sales Cap Vibrant ADAA Art Show

Dealers at the 18th annual Art Show, held by the Art Dealers Association of America (ADAA) at the Seventh Regiment Armory on Park Avenue from Feb. 23-27, reported strong sales despite a slight drop in overall attendance. This year’s fair drew 11,000 visitors, down a thousand from last year. “We had a very good fair—we

NEW YORK—Dealers at the 18th annual Art Show, held by the Art Dealers Association of America (ADAA) at the Seventh Regiment Armory on Park Avenue from Feb. 23-27, reported strong sales despite a slight drop in overall attendance. This year’s fair drew 11,000 visitors, down a thousand from last year. “We had a very good fair—we were very pleased with our sales,” L&M Arts partner Robert Mnuchin told ARTnewsletter. Sales included an abstract painting by Gerhard Richter with an asking price of $1.9 million, though the final price slid a bit lower, says Mnuchin. Other L&M sales: a 1964 Andy Warhol soup can painting, a 1952 Willem de Kooning drawing and a 1982 Jean-Michel Basquiat drawing.

The show was “really good, and very active,” Knoedler & Company director Ann Freedman told ARTnewsletter. “People were responsive to the works we exhibited.” Among Knoedler’s sales: paintings by Robert Motherwell and Michael Goldberg; a Joseph Cornell collage; and a David Smith work on paper that was accompanied by a picture of Smith with the work, taken by photographer Dan Budnick. The gallery declined to disclose prices achieved.

“I thought the show looked better than in years past,” gallery owner Susan Sheehan told ARTnewsletter. “There seemed to be a lot of high-end works. Attending the the fair was a very focused group of collectors who were looking for something great and buying it.” Sheehan says she sold more than 20 works, including a set of ten 1990 woodcuts by Donald Judd for a price “in excess of $60,000.” Other sales included a set of 1980s prints by Willem de Kooning that sold for more than $50,000, and works by Richard Diebenkorn, Joan Mitchell and Cy Twombly.

PaceWildenstein, which turned its stand over entirely to paintings of Maine by Alex Katz, reports that all works were sold. Zwirner & Wirth says four sculptures by Claes Oldenburg attained figures ranging from $400,000/2 million each.

Boston dealer Barbara Krakow notes that her booth sold out its offerings, including works by Sol LeWitt (gouache on paper, woodcut); Julian Opie (vinyl on stretcher bars); Fred Sandback (drawing); Kiki Smith (sculpture and drawing); and Richard Serra (etching). Prices ranged from $15,000/45,000.

Chelsea gallery Lehmann Maupin, in its first appearance at the fair, featured photographs and photo-derived plastic sculptures by Teresita Fernandez. The gallery reports that two Fernandez sculptural works depicting icebergs were sold.

Among other results, Weinstein Gallery, Minneapolis, sold over 20 works, including more than 12 photographs by artists such as Alec Soth, whose large color prints included a series taken on a journey along the Mississippi River; Mike and Doug Starn; and Robert Mapplethorpe.

The Tanya Bonakdar Gallery scored sales of works by German artist Thomas Scheibitz, including one sculpture and five paintings priced from $15,000/45,000.

Cheim & Read, New York, sold a work by Mitchell and small sculptures by Jenny Holzer that reproduce the artist’s enigmatic slogans in a revolving ticker of light-emitting diodes. Kraushaar Galleries, New York, sold an Oscar Bluemner study for a work that presently is in the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, D.C.

David Tunick, Inc., Manhattan, saw sales of works by Robert Rauschenberg, Pablo Picasso, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec and several Old Master drawings. A series of Mathias Goeritz maquettes for a large-scale sculpture in Mexico City, was sold for more than $175,000 by Latin American art specialist Mary-Anne Martin.

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