ARTnewsletter Archive

Vibrant Hindman Sale Reflects a ‘Really Strong Market’

A sale of paintings, prints, drawings and sculpture at Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, Chicago, on Sept. 26-27, realized $2.2 million for 373 lots on offer. The works ranged from 19th-century marine paintings and landscapes to Edward Weston photographs, Andy Warhol prints and a work by Shirin Neshat.

NEW YORK—A sale of paintings, prints, drawings and sculpture at Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, Chicago, on Sept. 26-27, realized $2.2 million for 373 lots on offer. The works ranged from 19th-century marine paintings and landscapes to Edward Weston photographs, Andy Warhol prints and a work by Shirin Neshat.

“It’s just a really strong market right now,” auction house president Leslie Hindman told ARTnewsletter. “We had so much interest, including some from European buyers, and we’re doing really well with contemporary art.”

The highest price of the sale was an oil on canvas by Helen Frankenthaler (b.1928), The Sound of the Bassoon, 1974, which brought $411,200, well over the estimate of $100,000/150,000. The painting was acquired from the Andre Emmerich Gallery, New York, by the Hilton hotel, New Orleans, in 1977. Two years earlier it had been included in an exhibition at the Corcoran Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. The provenance and quality of the painting sparked intense demand,

Hindman notes.

Other highlights included La Roulette, 1926, by Jean Metzinger (1883-1956), which sold for $388,800 against an estimated $80,000/120,000. The work came from the Kmart art collection and was one of several offered in the wake of the company’s decision to close a building in Troy, Mich. “It was a very large, impressive picture,” affirms Hindman, adding that about a dozen phone bidders, along with buyers in the room, vied for the work. She believes that, in some instances, conservative estimates helped spur bidding. A Warhol print, Moonwalk (Yellow), for instance, fetched $45,600, more than twice the high estimate of $20,000.

An oil on canvas by regional artist Roger Brown (1941-97), City Lake, 1971, more than doubled the $15,000 high estimate when it brought $36,000. The painting, also from the Kmart collection, would typically command a price around the estimated range, says Hindman, noting that two private collectors went head-to-head in bidding for the work.

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