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Winterling Images Click at Her First American Show

All but one of the works in German artist Susanne Winterling’s one-person show of video and still-image photographs at the Daniel Reich Gallery in Manhattan this past summer found buyers.

NEW YORK—All but one of the works in German artist Susanne Winterling’s one-person show of video and still-image photographs at the Daniel Reich Gallery in Manhattan this past summer found buyers.

The three 7-minute videos—Play Winterling, Les sens pratique and Piles of Shade, in editions of three—all sold at $3,000 apiece; the set of six still images, in editions of three, all sold at $7,000 per set; two one-of-a-kind still images appropriated from movies, priced at $1,800 each, found takers; and one photomontage, from an edition of three, fell for $2,500.

The only unsold work was a 16 mm. film titled, like the show, I’ll be Your Mirror, but I’ll Dissolve, priced at $7,000, according to gallery director Laura Higgins. “Prices were modest” for the Winterling works, Higgins told ARTnewsletter, explaining that “it was [the artist’s] first major exhibition in New York . . . and we had based the prices on how works were priced in Europe.”

Winterling (b. 1968), who lives and works in Berlin, has exhibited her images at various galleries and art spaces in Europe and as part of group shows in the U.S., but Daniel Reich appears to be her first actual gallery, though Higgins won’t characterize their relationship as representation. “We’re working with her rather heavily,” she acknowledges.

The gallery also has other C-print photomontages by the artist, priced around $3,000. Winterling’s still images suggest, without fully revealing, a larger narrative. The appropriated pictures in the recent exhibition were selected stills from Ken Loach’s film Kes and Rainer Werner Fassbinder’s Effi Briest.

“We assume that she won’t get sued,” Higgins says of Winterling’s appropriations, “because they’re used as part of a different context.” According to the gallery, there has been no secondary market activity for the artist’s work.

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