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Asian Contemporary Fair Off to a Promising Start

The first Asian Contemporary Art Fair, New York, held from Nov. 9-12 at Pier 92 on Manhattan’s West Side, made an impressive debut, with organizers reporting an estimated 19,000 visitors and $12 million in sales.

NEW YORK—The first Asian Contemporary Art Fair, New York, held from Nov. 9-12 at Pier 92 on Manhattan’s West Side, made an impressive debut, with organizers reporting an estimated 19,000 visitors and $12 million in sales.

The fair featured 94 galleries and publications; more than half came from Asia, including 8 from China; 2, India; 14, Japan; and 25, Korea. Germany, England, France and Switzerland were represented, as was the U.S., with approximately 20 galleries participating.

Among the sales, according to organizers, was an untitled, mixed-media work on paper by Zhang Xiaogang that sold at the stand of Seoul’s Gallery Artside for $380,000, the top price of the fair; and Huang Gang’s Mao’s Good! Good!, a 2006 mixed-media work depicting Mao Tse-Tung (1893-1976) as an abstract, spectral figure, which was sold for $150,000 by Ping’s Gallery, Taipei. Prices ranged from $950 for a photograph to an average of $15,000/80,000 for most works, organizers said.

Michael Goedhuis, who operates a gallery in New York that specializes in contemporary Asian art, praised the organization of the fair as well as the accompanying panel discussions and events; the schedule included a discussion between Yale University School of Art dean Robert Storr and artist Xu Bing. Goedhuis told ARTnewsletter “the opening was more brisk and better attended than I expected.” However, he added, “I don’t think it was quite as commercially successful as we hoped.”

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