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Phillips Design Sale Misses Low Estimate

Phillips de Pury & Company's design sale, held in New York on Dec. 17, realized $2.2 million, down from the record £2.3 million ($4.3 million) total of its September sale in London and missing the $3.7 million low estimate.

NEW YORK—Phillips de Pury & Company’s design sale, held in New York on Dec. 17, realized $2.2million, down from the record £2.3million ($4.3million) total of its September sale in London and missing the $3.7million low estimate. Of 172 lots offered, 103, or 60 percent, found buyers. By value the auction was 55 percent sold.

The top lot was Marc Newson’s “Micarta” desk, 2006, from an edition of ten, which sold for $206,500, surpassing the high estimate of $190,000 with premium included. Two pairs of Newson’s “Komed” wall and ceiling lights, both circa 1996, also found buyers, selling for $27,500 and $50,000, both well above their $15,000/20,000 estimates.

The second-highest lot was a pair of Jean Royère’s small, egg-shaped purple “Oeuf” chairs, 1951, which sold for $124,900 against an estimate of $50,000/70,000. A chest of drawers, circa 1955, by Gio Ponti (1891–1979), sold for $92,500 (estimate: $60,000/80,000).

Of the seven works by Ron Arad (b. 1951) offered in the sale, four were sold. The highest price for an Arad work was $43,750, paid for the unique blown-aluminum “B.O.O.P. (Blown Out of Proportion)” vase, 1998, against an estimate of $35,000/45,000.

A “Moraine” sofa, 2000, by Zaha Hadid (b.1950), brought $50,000, just meeting the estimate of $50,000/70,000 with premium included.

Phillips worldwide director of design, Alexander Payne, said the results “confirmed the appetite for important and rare examples of both cutting-edge contemporary and modern design. There is no question that the circle of design buyers has greatly widened over the last five years and we are witnessing its staying power.”

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