ARTnewsletter Archive

Lucioni Painting Leads Skinner American/European Art Sale

Boston auction house Skinner’s sale of American and European art on March 6 had a total estimate of $1.2 million/1.8 million, and realized $1.1 million for 749 lots, of which 72 percent were sold.

NEW YORK—Boston auction house Skinner’s sale of American and European art on March 6 had a total estimate of $1.2 million/1.8 million, and realized $1.1 million for 749 lots, of which 72 percent were sold. The top lot of the sale was Luigi Lucioni’s oil painting Vermont Farm, 1931, which sold for $94,800, far surpassing the auctioneer’s $15,000/25,000 estimate. An oil-on-Masonite painting by Josef Albers, Young Eagle, 1936, also did well, taking $71,100 on a $20,000/30,000 estimate.

A number of paintings by William Robinson Leigh consigned from a New England collection—each estimated at $20,000/30,000—all sold, but in some cases for prices well below the estimate. Keams Canyon, 1919, sold for $47,400, while Summer Hogan, 1950, sold for $16,590; Trading a Pendleton Blanket brought $18,960; and Zuni Girl fetched $11,850.

John Henry Twachtman’s oil painting Riverside Village, Normandy, circa 1884, was sold for $23,700, well above its $12,000/18,000 estimate, and Indian artist Satish Gajral’s Days of Glory brought in $22,515 against an estimate of $10,000/15,000.

A number of other works also exceeded the auction house’s admittedly conservative estimates. George Willoughby Maynard’s oil A Refreshing Repast, 1876, fetched $15,405, far above its $4,000/6,000 estimate, and German-American artist Gustave Baumann’s color woodcut print Strang­ers from Hopiland was sold for $13,035, nearly quadrupling its $2,500/3,500 estimate.

  • Issues