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Hauser & Wirth, Zwirner to Open New Manhattan Galleries

Dealer David Zwirner is planning to open a new gallery space in Manhattan’s West Chelsea this fall, adding to the 34,000 square feet of exhibition and office space the David Zwirner gallery already occupies in three adjoining locations on the north side of 19th Street.

NEW YORK—Dealer David Zwirner is planning to open a new gallery space in Manhattan’s West Chelsea this fall, adding to the 34,000 square feet of exhibition and office space the David Zwirner gallery already occupies in three adjoining locations on the north side of 19th Street.

The new venue, which includes 5,000 square feet of gallery space, will occupy the ground floor of Japanese architect Shigeru Ban’s “Metal Shutter Houses,” across the street from the current three locations. According to a statement from the gallery, the proximity to the existing space “will enable the Zwirner gallery to pursue more ambitious, large-scale exhibitions, further developing the model of recent two-venue presentations.”

The new space, to be called Zwirner, will continue the activities of David Zwirner gallery’s collaboration with Swiss dealer Iwan Wirth, known as Zwirner & Wirth, under the directorship of Kristine Bell.

Although Zwirner & Wirth will no longer operate a physical gallery space in New York, the two dealers plan to “maintain and expand their strategic partnership focusing on acquisitions and collections management.” For the fall, they have scheduled an exhibition of Los Angeles–based artists from the 1960s and ’70s, drawn from the collection of Helga and Walther Lauffs.

Meanwhile, Hauser & Wirth, of which Iwan Wirth is president and owner, and which has exhibition spaces in Zurich and London, is also expanding, and will open a New York gallery in September.

Hauser & Wirth, New York, will be housed in four full floors of exhibition and event space at 32 East 69th Street, which was the former location of Zwirner & Wirth’s New York operation. Architect Annabelle Selldorf, of Selldorf Architects, will design the new space, which until 1970 was the home of the Martha Jackson Gallery. The opening exhibition will be a re-creation of Allen Kap­row’s installation YARD, 1961, in which the backyard of a Manhattan townhouse was filled with rubber tires for viewers to climb in and around. Future exhibitions are planned for Paul McCarthy, Ida Apple­broog, Eva Hesse and Roni Horn.

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