ARTnewsletter Archive

Shannon’s Sale Hits Its Mark

The Terrace Samarkand, 1927, a painting by Colin Campbell Cooper (1856–1937), drew the highest price at a sale of American and European drawings, paintings and sculpture at Shannon’s, Greenwich, Conn., on Oct. 29.

NEW YORK—The Terrace Samarkand, 1927, a painting by Colin Campbell Cooper (1856–1937), drew the highest price at a sale of American and European drawings, paintings and sculpture at Shannon’s, Greenwich, Conn., on Oct. 29. The oil painting sold for $456,000, including buyer’s premium, well above the $200,000/300,000 estimate. It was the second-highest price ever paid for a work by Cooper, after the $881,000 paid last year at Christie’s for a street scene featuring the New York Public Library (estimate: $120,000/180,000). Over all, just under 74 percent of the 245 lots found buyers, and the sale brought in a total of $3.6million, within the $3.2million/3.8million estimate.

Among the other top lots were Jasper Francis Cropsey’s Autumn View, Greenwood Lake, 1888, which sold for $132,000 on an estimate of $200,000/300,000; Ernest Lawson’s Boathouses Along a River, 1910–12, which sold for $120,000 on an estimate of $120,000/180,000; and Eastman Johnson’s Boyhood of Lincoln, 1867, which sold for $90,000 on an estimate of $40,000/60,000.

The sale was up and down, with some higher-estimated lots—notably Winslow Homer’s watercolor Gloucester Harbor, Ten Pound Island (estimate: $200,000/300,000) and Alfred Thompson Bricher’s Summer Pond, Southampton (estimate: $70,000/100,000)—failing to find buyers, but many others exceeding estimates, sometimes by a significant margin. Polish artist Stephan Bakalowicz’s Trading Ships on the Nile, 1920, sold for $72,000, well above its $25,000/35,000 estimate; Swiss painter Luigi Chialiva’s Feeding the Sheep also brought $72,000, against a $15,000/25,000 estimate. Rolph Scarlett’s Abstraction fetched $78,000 against a $15,000/25,000 estimate, and Walter Launt Palmer’s Winter Morning, 1912, sold for $45,600 against a $25,000/35,000 estimate.

“There was buying at every price level,” auction house president Gene Shannon told ARTnews­letter, noting that much of the enthusiasm was due to the fact that “95 percent of the items in the sale came from private or corporate collections or from estates. That is, they were fresh to the market, and people were excited to see them.”

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