ARTnewsletter Archive

Strong Prices Continue at Second Auction of Saint Laurent Collection

The four-day part-two sale of the Collection of Yves Saint Laurent and Pierre Bergé held by Christie’s (in association with Pierre Bergé & Associates) at the Théâtre Marigny on Nov. 17–20, nine months after the historic €373.9 million ($483.8 million) part-one sale at the Grand Palais (ANL, 3/3/09), was highly successful.

PARIS—The four-day part-two sale of the Collection of Yves Saint Laurent and Pierre Bergé held by Christie’s (in association with Pierre Bergé & Associates) at the Théâtre Marigny on Nov. 17–20, nine months after the historic €373.9million ($483.8million) part-one sale at the Grand Palais (ANL, 3/3/09), was highly successful. The sale brought in a total of €8.99million ($13.4million) and was 98 percent sold both by lot and by value. The profits from the sale are to be donated to support medical research and the fight against AIDS.

The sale offered 1,180 works of art and objects (including jewelry, furniture, decorative objects and silver) from the two collectors’ Château Gabriel in Bénerville, France, and from their Paris residences. The top lot was a pair of ball armchairs from the salon at Saint Laurent’s home on the rue de Babylone. Estimated at €7,000/9,000, the pair sold for €241,000 to an Asian collector.

The top lots among the offerings of modern and contemporary art included Les travailleurs au repos, 1949–50, a gouache, ink and pencil drawing by Fernand Léger, which sold for €181,000 ($269,872) against an estimate of €50,000/70,000. A bronze sculpture with a golden patina by the French artist César (1921–1998), L’homme de Draguignan, conceived in 1957 and executed between 1964 and 1968, took in €157,000 ($234,088) on an estimate of €40,000/60,000, and one of the artist’s compression pieces, Portrait de compression, was sold for €75,400 ($112,422) against an estimate of €20,000/30,000. A 1992 fish vase by Niki de Saint-Phalle sold for €43,000 ($64,113)—six times its estimate of €5,000/7,000; another vase by the artist, of a dog, sold for €32,200 ($48,010) on the same estimate. Equinoxe, 1967, an etching by Joan Miró, sold for €39,400 ($58,746) against an estimate of €25,000/35,000. A pair of etchings by Pablo Picasso estimated at €10,000/15,000, Sueño y mentira de Franco, 1937, sold for €29,800 ($44,432). The table-cloth in the Atlantic Ocean, 1931, an illustration by Max Ernst in pencil rubbing on paper, was estimated at €4,000/6,000 and sold for €22,500 ($33,548).

A pencil study on paper of two skeletons by Jean-Baptiste Camille Corot sold for €12,500 ($18,638), more than ten times the estimate of €1,000/1,500. A sculpture of a bird, a model for Daum by François-Xavier Lalanne, sold for €10,625 ($15,842), well beyond its estimate of €600/800. A pair of pencil drawings by the artist sold for €6,875 ($10,251) on an estimate of €1,500/2,000. An acrylic and charcoal on canvas by Alexander Liberman from 1978 sold for €8,125 ($12,114) on an estimate of €3,000/4,000; another sold for €7,500 ($11,183) on the same estimate. A gelatin silver print taken by Henri Cartier-Bresson in Ireland in 1952 sold for €6,875 ($10,251), more than double its estimate of €2,000/3,000, and a 1966 self-portrait in oil by the French artist Bernard Dufour brought in €5,000 ($7,455), several times its estimate of €500/700.

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