• ARTnewsletter Archive

    Chagall Shines at Mainichi Modern Art in Tokyo

    Mainichi Auction, one of the oldest auction houses in Japan, held a sale of modern art—one of its three major annual auctions—on April 10, taking in ¥465.2 million ($5 million), up considerably from the result of the previous sale, last November, which brought in a total of ¥286.2 million ($3.2 million).

    SUMI NAKAMICHI,TOKYO—Mainichi Auction, one of the oldest auction houses in Japan, held a sale of modern art—one of its three major annual auctions—on April 10, taking in ¥465.2million ($5million), up considerably from the result of the previous sale, last November, which brought in a total of ¥286.2million ($3.2million). Of 356 lots on offer, 258, or 72.4 percent, found buyers.

    Among the top lots by Western artists, L’arlequin de Saint-Paul, 1973, an oil and gouache on canvas by Marc Chagall, fetched ¥52million ($556,000), within the ¥40million/60million estimate. (All prices given here are without buyer’s premium.) Cirque, 1967, a complete set of 38 lithographs by Chagall, sold for ¥18million ($193,000), within the estimate of ¥15million/20million.

    Femme á l’éventail, 1920, a bronze sculpture by Ossip Zadkine, sold for ¥15million ($160,000), more than double the estimate of ¥5million/7million, and Nature morte sous la lampe, 1962, a linocut by Pablo Picasso, sold for ¥8million ($85,600), slightly higher than the estimate of ¥5million/7million.

    Among the top-selling Yoga works—oil paintings by Japanese artists—Bara wo Motsu Onna Tachi, 1960, a painting by Fujita Tsuguharu, sold for ¥48million ($513,000) on an estimate of ¥40million/60million. Boutique de journaux, 1958, an oil painting by Takanori Ogis, sold for ¥13million ($139,000), within the estimate of ¥10million/15million, and Omoi, an oil by Sosuke Morimoto, sold for ¥6.6million ($70,600) on a ¥7million/10million estimate. Akatsubaki, 1964, a work by Yasuo Kabuki, sold for ¥5.1million ($54,500), more than twice the estimate of ¥1.5million/2million.

    Nihonga—traditional Japanese paintings—were not as strong in comparison with the other genres of art on offer. Among the top Nihonga lots were Ikuo Hirayama’s Houryu-ji no Tsuki yo, which brought ¥6.6million ($70,600) on a ¥5million/7million estimate; Hiroshi Senju’s Waterfall, which sold for ¥6.5million ($69,500) on a ¥6million/8million estimate; and Chikkyo Ono’s Haru Fuji, n.d., which sold for ¥4.8million ($51,300) on a ¥4million/5million estimate.