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    Karlsruhe Art Fair Draws Kudos From Collectors and Dealers

    Art Karlsruhe has come a long way. With its eighth edition, March 10–13, fair director and gallerist Ewald Karl Schrade’s project has reached the status of a destination event.

    KARLSRUHE—Art Karlsruhe has come a long way. With its eighth edition, March 10–13, fair director and gallerist Ewald Karl Schrade’s project has reached the status of a destination event. The fair is an embodiment of the evolving presence of most art fairs: Despite globalization, the majority have acquired a strong regional footing. Organizers at Karlsruhe reported attendance of 45,000, up 5,000 from the level achieved in 2010.

    Of the 200 galleries participating, only some 15 percent came from the neighboring countries France, Switzerland, and Austria, and there is only one U.S. gallery, Alp Galleries, New York.

    Art Karlsruhe presents a wide spectrum of the art scene, including “Young Positions,” in hall number four, with the rest of the show, including “Modern Classics” in the main halls.

    Michael Schultz Galleries, Berlin, Seoul and Beijing, showed extensively, selling, among others, a work by SEO at €45,000 ($62,000).

    Animals were a recurring subject. A life size but not too realistic installation of 50 pigeons, shown by Wagner and Partner, Berlin and created by identical twins Maria and Natalia Petschatnikov, from St Petersburg, Russia, priced at €300 ($410) each, was nearly sold out.

    Another work popular with fairgoers was Deborah Sengl’s life-size pig on an exercise bike, on view at the booth of Marcus Deschler, Berlin. Deschler sold several works by German artist Rainer Fetting of the Neo-Expressionist “Junge Wilde” school of the 1980s in the range of €11,000/30,000 ($15,000/41,000).

    Klaus Kiefer owner of KK Gallery, Essen, sold, among other works, a portrait by Johannes Grützke, for €9,000 ($12,400) and a very large-format image of a full-figured female nude by Lily Hill for €16,000 ($22,000).

    At Christine Rother of Wiesbaden, two Nabo Gass pieces were sold for €6,900 ($9,500), and Gabor Török sold nine of his small “First Step” sculptures for €1,600 ($2,200) each. Gallerist Angelo Falzone, Mannheim, sold works by Neo-romantic painter Martin Becker at €3,200 ($4,400). Zellermeyer, Berlin, sold a late Bernard Schultze abstraction for €85,000 ($117,000).