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Solid Results at Swann Print Sale

The heavy hitters came through at the Swann Galleries Sept. 22 sale of 19th- and 20th-century prints and drawings, as works by James Abbott McNeill Whistler, Pablo Picasso, Edward Hopper, Henri Matisse and Marc Chagall brought the highest prices.

NEW YORK—The heavy hitters came through at the Swann Galleries Sept. 22 sale of 19th- and 20th-century prints and drawings, as works by James Abbott McNeill Whistler, Pablo Picasso, Edward Hopper, Henri Matisse and Marc Chagall brought the highest prices.

An etching by Whistler, Upright Venice, ca.1879-80, was the top lot, earning $90,000 with premium, far outpacing the $30,000/50,000 estimate. Not far behind were works by Picasso, including a linoleum cut Portrait of Jacqueline in a Head Band, 1962, which sold for $72,000, compared with an estimate of $50,000/75,000, and a 1930 pencil drawing, Meleager Kills the Boar of Calydon, which sold for $60,000, against an estimate of $40,000/60,000.

Hopper’s etching, Portrait of Walter Tittle, 1918, sold for $48,000, against an estimate of $15,000/20,000, while Night Shadows, 1921, sold for $33,600, compared with an estimate of $30,000/50,000.

A 1923 lithograph by Matisse, Odalisque au Magnolia, sold for $38,400 compared with an estimate of $30,000/50,000 and a color lithograph by Chagall, Carmen, 1967, sold for $38,400 compared with an estimate of $40,000/60,000. Overall, the sale realized $2.4 million, falling just within the presale estimate of $2.4 million/3.6 million. Of 634 lots on offer, 513, or 80 percent, found buyers.

Other solid results included: an El Lissitzky untitled watercolor, ca. 1920, that sold for $24,000 on an estimate of $30,000/50,000; a gouache by Fernand Leger, Acrobat, ca. 1950, that sold for $22,800 compared with an estimate of $20,000/30,00; and Martin Lewis’s drypoint, Quarter of Nine, Saturday’s Children, 1929, that sold for $19,200, compared with an estimate of $15,000/20,000, as well as the drypoint, Chance Meeting, 1940-1, that realized $19,200 on an estimate of $8,000/10,000.

Other lots that significantly exceeded estimates included: Rene Magritte’s etching, Self Portrait with a Hat, 1966, that realized $15,600, on an estimate of $5,000/8,000; Leger’s color lithograph, Marie the Acrobat, 1948, which sold for $19,200, compared with an estimate of $8,000/12,000; two Chagall etchings for a book, The Seven Deadly Sins, which sold for $10,800, on an estimate of $4,000/6,000; Whistler’s lithograph, The Steps, Luxembourg, 1893, which sold for $10,800 on an estimate of $4,000/6,000; and Kees Van Dongen’s color collotype, Woman Applying Make-up, ca. 1925, that sold for $13,200, compared with an estimate of $2,000/3,000.

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