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    10 New Photo Shows Expose the Insides of Statues and Atoms, Women and Revolutions

    Exhibitions bring out the stylish, edgy side of Collier Schorr, Malick Sidibé, Amy Arbus, Harold Edgerton, and more

    David Maisel: History’s Shadow
    Where: Yancey Richardson Gallery
    When: Through May 10

    David Maisel’s X-rays of art objects offer glimpses of what could be the secret troubled soul of antique statues. Against a black background, glowing traces show what is normally hidden by carefully worked surfaces; twisted supports and fillings, nails, and unexpected hollows suggest the unseen interior life of these objects.

    David Maisel, History’s Shadow GM3, 2005-6, archival pigment print. ©DAVID MAISEL, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND YANCEY RICHARDSON.

    David Maisel, History’s Shadow GM3, 2005-6, archival pigment print.

    ©DAVID MAISEL, COURTESY THE ARTIST AND YANCEY RICHARDSON.

    Matthew Brandt: Excavations
    Where: Yossi Milo Gallery
    When: Through May 10

    A glittering picture replaces dots of ink with rhinestones and tiny beads of shiny caviar to recreate a newspaper photo; dust swept from Madison Square Park is used as pigment in a gum bichromate print showing the destruction of Stanford White’s nearby Madison Square Garden; and tar from the La Brea Tar Pits was baked by the sun on a metal plate to make a huge heliograph of a condor skeleton found there. In Brandt’s clever experimentations, photography is a tool for depicting what is gone or disappearing fast.

    Matthew Brandt, La Brea D2AB, from the series La Brea, 2013, two heliographs made with tar from the La Brea Tar pits Los Angeles, California on aluminum, unique. ©MATTHEW BRANDT, COURTESY YOSSI MILO GALLERY, NEW YORK.

    Matthew Brandt, La Brea D2AB, from the series La Brea, 2013, two heliographs made with tar from the La Brea Tar pits Los Angeles, California on aluminum, unique.

    ©MATTHEW BRANDT, COURTESY YOSSI MILO GALLERY, NEW YORK.

    Sarah Jones
    Where: Anton Kern Gallery
    When: Through April 26

    Sarah Jones’s large-scale photos exist at the edge of visibility. Her C-Prints are drained of color and sometimes made from black and white negatives, occasionally disappearing into darkness. Shiny black fur defines the muscular shape of a black horse which appears with its uncanny double; thorny rose vines prick a black sky. It’s a witchy world that plays with the ways photography can deceive and flatten what it depicts.

    Sarah Jones, Horse (profile) (black) (II/I), 2014, C Print. COURTESY ANTON KERN GALLERY, NEW YORK.

    Sarah Jones, Horse (profile) (black) (II/I), 2014, C-Print.

    COURTESY ANTON KERN GALLERY, NEW YORK.

    Jerome Liebling: Matter of Life and Death
    Where: Steven Kasher Gallery
    When: Through April 19

    Liebling, who died in 2011, made photographs in a variety of styles over his long career—from energetic black and white shots of children in New York City and Vermont to more placid color scenes of apple orchards and Shaker homes. Whatever his subject, Liebling uncovered grace in everyday life.

    Jerome Liebling Atkins Orchard, Amherst Massachusetts, 1979, chromogenic print, printed circa 1995. ©JEROME LIEBLING PHOTOGRAPHY LLC, COURTESY STEVEN KASHER GALLERY, NEW YORK.

    Jerome Liebling Atkins Orchard, Amherst Massachusetts, 1979, chromogenic print, printed circa 1995.

    ©JEROME LIEBLING PHOTOGRAPHY LLC, COURTESY STEVEN KASHER GALLERY, NEW YORK.

    Proof: The Intersection of Science, Art and Photography
    Where: L. Parker Stephenson Photographs
    When: Through May 17

    A lacrosse player blurs into a strange staccato shape in a strobe-lit stop action shot by Harold Edgerton. Nearby, a splitting atom makes an equally poetic shape in a tiny black and white picture made the same year, 1939. The images here were mostly made in the pursuit of science but they share a cool, graphic stylishness that cuts across decades and subjects, comparing a tiny, tarnished gelatin silver picture of the moon with a photo showing grains of sodium chloride orders of magnitude smaller.

    Georges Demeny, Chronophotograph of a Man Jumping, 1896, gelatin silver print. ©GEORGES DEMENY. COURTESY L. PARKER STEPHENSON PHOTOGRAPHS, NEW YORK.

    Georges Demeny, Chronophotograph of a Man Jumping, 1896, gelatin silver print.

    ©ESTATE OF GEORGES DEMENY. COURTESY L. PARKER STEPHENSON PHOTOGRAPHS, NEW YORK.

    METRO
    Where: Julie Saul Gallery
    When: Through April 19

    How do people interact in the tight confines of city life? Three photographers offer vastly different answers to this question, but all are dependent on technology. Most unsettling are Reinier Gerritsen’s images made at the Wall Street subway stop. Commuters stand close together on crowded trains, but since the photos are composites of multiple exposures, we will never know if his subjects were studiously ignoring each other or truly alone.

    Adam Magyar, Tokyo I, 2007-09, pigment print, edition 1/3. COURTESY OF JULIE SAUL GALLERY, NEW YORK.

    Adam Magyar, Tokyo I, 2007-09, pigment print.

    COURTESY JULIE SAUL GALLERY, NEW YORK.

    Matthew Pillsbury: Nate and Me
    Where: Sasha Wolf Gallery
    When: Through April 20

    In Matthew Pillsbury’s long-exposure black and white images, human subjects become a soft blur, leaving their dimly lit surroundings and glowing media to speak for them. Aperture recently showed Pillsbury’s work, but this is a more intimate set of pictures showing Pillsbury himself, often with Nathan Noland, who Pillsbury met and fell in love with when he was 30, coming out as a gay man.

    Nathan Noland, Mario Kart DS, The Starr Cup, Wynn Las Vegas, Monday July 31st, 2006. 12:34-12:52AM, archival pigment print. COURTESY OF BONNI BENRUBI GALLERY.

    Matthew Pillsbury, Nathan Noland, Mario Kart DS, The Starr Cup, Wynn Las Vegas, Monday July 31st, 2006. 12:34-12:52AM, archival pigment print.

    COURTESY BONNI BENRUBI GALLERY.

    Amy Arbus: On the Street 1980-1990
    Where: Leica Gallery
    When: Through April 19

    The characters in Arbus’s black and white street portraits from the 1980s and ’90s seem to have invented themselves out of verve and energy. In a fur bikini or exotic hats, her subjects are specimens from a rougher but perhaps more open New York.

    Amy Arbus

    Left: Amy Arbus, Hat and Men’s Tie, 1984, gelatin silver print. Right: Fingernail Extensions, 1988, gelatin silver print.

    ©AMY ARBUS, COURTESY LEICA GALLERY.

    Malick Sidibé
    Where: Jack Shainman Gallery
    When: Through April 26

    Sidibé is well known for the stylish and exuberant studio portraits and nightlife photos he made in Mali starting in the 1960s, shortly after the country’s independence. Included here are vintage and recent prints, and rarely seen color Polaroids, all of which celebrate the excitement and hopefulness that comes with new freedom.

    Malick Sidibé, Regardez Moi, 1962/2007, silver gelatin print. © MALICK SIDIBÉ. COURTESY THE ARTIST AND JACK SHAINMAN GALLERY, NEW YORK.

    Malick Sidibé, Regardez Moi, 1962/2007, gelatin silver print.

    ©MALICK SIDIBÉ. COURTESY THE ARTIST AND JACK SHAINMAN GALLERY, NEW YORK.

    Collier Schorr: 8 Women
    Where: 303 Gallery
    When: Through April 12

    For years, Schorr has been looking at the construction of masculinity in her art while shooting women for slick and edgy fashion photographs. The images here, drawn in part from that work, challenge and invite with references ranging from Courbet to Jeff Wall.

    CS 792

    Collier Schorr, Picture for Women, 2010-2014, pigment print.

    ©COLLIER SCHORR, COURTESY 303 GALLERY, NEW YORK.

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