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    Morning Links: Lawsuit Edition

    The Chelsea Hotel. COURTESY WIKIPEDIA

    The Chelsea Hotel.

    COURTESY WIKIPEDIA

    The Larry Rivers Foundation sues Chelsea Hotel owner Joseph Chetrit for the return of a painting that used to hang there. [New York Post]

    A judge in a Washington D.C. court heard an arguments from the Corcoran Gallery of Art’s board chairman in favor of its merger with the National Gallery of Art. The merger went to court this week over a group of Corcoran students and employees sued to stop it. [The New York Times]

    The Goldfinch, the biggest art-related bestseller since The Da Vinci Code, lands a movie deal. Brett Ratner will produce. [BBC via Artnet]

    Per Skarstedt buys five-story “dream house” on the UES. [The Real Deal, via Art Market Monitor]

    “Art Everywhere U.S., a campaign that will exhibit American art on billboards, telephone kiosks, subways, movie screens, newsstands, and bus shelters, will launch on Aug. 4 in Times Square. 58 works—including Gilbert Stuart’s portrait of George Washington, James McNeill Whistler’s “Symphony in White, No. 1,” Mary Cassatt’s “The Child’s Bath,” and Andy Warhol’s “Campbell’s Soup Can”—will be on view on 50,000 display sites throughout the country.” [The Wall Street Journal]

    New board members for the Rose Art Museum. [Artforum]

    Crystal Bridges shakes up its curatorial team. [ArtDaily]

    Taiwan’s first lady will resume plans to travel to Japan, after the Tokyo museum’s failure to mention the word “national” in on its posters and tickets to a show of loaned Taiwanese artifacts there caused her to put the trip on hold. The museum has since fixed the posters. [Agence France-Presse]

    The Cincinnati Art Museum has named Cameron Kitchin as its new director. He’s currently the director of the Brooks Museum of Art in Memphis. [The Cincinnati Enquirer]

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