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Morning Links: Dinner Party Edition

Judy Chicago, The Dinner Party, 1974–79.COURTESY THE ARTIST AND THE BROOKLYN MUSEUM

Judy Chicago, The Dinner Party, 1974–79.

COURTESY THE ARTIST AND THE BROOKLYN MUSEUM

Roberta Smith takes a nuanced view of “The Forever Now,” the contemporary painting show that just opened at MoMA. [The New York Times]

Museums are collecting more data about their visitors, and trying to get your smartphone involved more in general. Here’s the attempt at outrage: “When you’re looking at the art, you don’t want the art looking back at you,” said Marc Rotenberg, a Georgetown University law professor who heads the Electronic Privacy Information Center, a privacy research group. “It’s not as if people going out of museums say, ‘Jeez, I wish that museum knew a lot more about me, I would’ve had a lot better experience.’ It’s being driven by the possibility of increased sales, advertising and better marketing.” [The Wall Street Journal]

Maurizio Cattelan and Ali Subotnick traveled around Los Angeles, visiting Jim Carrey’s studio among other places, while everyone was in Miami. Here is their travel diary. [New York]

The reshuffling at Christie’s continue: “Christie’s said its new chief executive, Patricia Barbizet, had created expanded roles in the company for its most prominent auctioneer, Jussi Pylkkänen, who will become global president, and for Stephen Brooks, who becomes global chief operating officer.” [The New York Times]

Judy Chicago’s The Dinner Party made Queen Sonja of Norway realize she was a feminist. [The Wall Street Journal]

The Guardian‘s whacky critics, Jonathan Jones and Sean O’Hagan, get into a ridiculous fight about whether photography is or isn’t art. [The Guardian]

Adrien de Vries figures sold for $27.9 million at Christie’s. [Art Market Monitor]

The Kuchera Museum, devoted to the work of John Kuchera, just opened in a 600-square-foot apartment in Manhattan’s Morningside Heights neighborhood. [The New York Times]

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