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Morning Links: Picasso Edition

A 1912 PORTRAIT OF PABLO PICASSO BY JUAN GRIS.  COURTESY WIKIMEDIA.

A 1912 portrait of Pablo Picasso by Juan Gris.

COURTESY WIKIMEDIA

The Swiss family foundation that reportedly sold a painting by Paul Gauguin to the Qatar Museums Authority for a record $300m has withdrawn the long-term loan of its 19th- and 20th-century art collection from the Kunstmuseum Basel. [The Art Newspaper]

Arthur K. Wheelock Jr., a curator at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, remembers Walter Liedtke, the Met curator and art historian who died in last week’s Metro North train accident. [The Wall Street Journal]

In case there was any doubt, scientists have figured out why viewing art at a museum is more pleasurable than viewing it in reproduction. [Science of Us]

Admission at the Milwaukee Art Museum will be free the weekend after next. [Journal Sentinel]

The Detroit Institute of Arts is the latest museum to ban selfie sticks. [CBS Detroit]

Here’s a profile of Amanda Cruz, the new director of the Phoenix Art Museum. [Phoenix Business Journal]

The trial of Pierre Le Guennec, Picasso’s handyman, begins today. Le Guennec and his wife claim that Picasso or his wife gave them 180 lithographs, collages, and paintings, and 91 drawings — works which have never been displayed publicly — sometime around 1970. The couple could face up to five years in prison and a €375,000 fine if convicted for concealing stolen goods. [The Guardian]

Here’s a profile of British artist Richard Wentworth, the ‘invisible man’ who worked with Henry Moore, designed sets for Roxy Music, and helped launch the YBAs. [The Telegraph]

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