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Morning Links: Continuing ‘Conversations’ Controversy Edition

Bill Cosby and his wife lent art to the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art's show "Conversations." THE WORLD AFFAIRS COUNCIL OF PHILADELPHIA/VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Bill Cosby.

THE WORLD AFFAIRS COUNCIL OF PHILADELPHIA/VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Johnnetta B. Cole, the director of the Smithsonian National Museum of African Art, finally speaks out about its controversial show “Conversations,” which features loans from the Cosbys. “This exhibition is not about the life and career of Bill Cosby,” Cole writes in this essay. [The Root]

An exhibition in West Hollywood looks at how AIDS changed American art. [Wired]

Charles Goldenstein, a Manhattan lawyer who advocated for the restitution of Nazi-looted art, died at 78 last week. [New York Times]

Ten years later, Hurricane Katrina has only made New Orleans–based artists even more creative. [WDSU News]

A trip to the art museum can help medical students connect with dementia patients, a study finds. [NPR]

Michael Smith at Greene Naftali. [Contemporary Art Daily]

How one 19th-century slave sculpture exposed the American public to nudity in art for what may have been the first time. [Hyperallergic]

Spaceworks, a New York nonprofit, has received $10 million and plans to use it to give artists studio space in the Bronx. [The Observer]

The Cultivist, a “members’-club-cum-concierge-service for art enthusiasts,” picks 12 hidden art gems. [T Magazine]

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