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    Morning Links: Mobsters and Dealers Edition

    The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

    The Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum.

    VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

    ART CRIMES

    The FBI has been trying to pressure supposed mobster Robert Gentile into working with them on the Isabella Stewart Gardner case, and now he claims that they tried to trick him into illegally buying a gun. [ABC News]

    “What do a Manhattan-based billionaire, a naked Russian model, and a loaded gun have to do with one of the biggest tax fraud trials in French history now underway in Paris?” The art-dealing Wildenstein family, of course! [The Daily Beast]

    According to convicted art forger Shaun Greenhalgh’s memoir, the secret to a great fake means more than just creating a decent lookalike work. It also means creating a false world that surrounds it. [The New Republic]

    THE PERENNIAL ART-MARKET BUBBLE QUESTION

    Could an art-market bubble be forming and getting ready to burst? Researchers at the University of Luxembourg may have the data to prove it. [Phys.Org]

    HERE’S WHAT THOMAS KRENS IS UP TO

    Thomas Krens has officially unveiled the plans for his for-profit Global Contemporary Art Museum, which may be open in the Berkshires in 2018. [The Observer]

    RETROSPECTIVES

    Here’s the story of how LACMA and the Whitney worked together on an enormous Frank Stella piece from 1984. [Unframed]

    Holland Cotter on Walid Raad’s MoMA retrospective, which he calls “a set of fantastic tales spun from a few hard facts, with the live equivalent of an operatic mad scene at the center.” [The New York Times]

    It’s not quite a retrospective, but here’s a look at Ugo Rondinone’s ode to his partner, John Giorno, which is in its final days at the Palais de Tokyo. [Contemporary Art Daily]

    UPCOMING SHOWS IN NEW YORK

    Mark Flood discusses curating a new show at Marlborough Chelsea titled “The Future Is Ow” and his feelings about collectors. “The great thing about young art is that you can buy it by the wheelbarrow,” he says. [The Observer]

    Thrown-out Christmas trees will now become a part of Michael Neff’s Suspended Forest, an installation at the Knockdown Center, in Queens. [Artinfo]

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