• Morning Links

    Morning Links: Tax-Smart Collectors Edition

    An accountant helping a collector save money while doing taxes, maybe. COURTESY SHUTTERSTOCK

    An accountant helping a collector save money while doing taxes, maybe.

    COURTESY SHUTTERSTOCK


    THE MONEY FLOWS (AND GETS TAXED)

    It’s tax season, which means it’s time for collectors to focus on keeping their estate as tax-free as possible. Here’s a look at how art collectors can “reap tax savings by transferring ownership of their paintings or other collectible objects, but keep possession so they can still enjoy them.” [The Wall Street Journal]

    A sales report from Art Basel Hong Kong, where, among other things, a Cy Twombly work was sold to a European collector. Its price tag: $10 million. [The New York Times]

    A new study finds that artists with narcissistic tendencies often produce more expensive work. A strong correlation has also been found between the size of an artist’s signature and whether he or she can be considered narcissistic according to a set of data. [The Telegraph]

    MUSEUMS

    The Denver Art Museum has returned a 10th-century sculpture to the government of Cambodia. The museum, likely unaware that it had been looted, acquired the sculpture in 1986. [The Denver Post]

    After a rejected Supreme Court appeal, Vincent van Gogh’s The Night Café (1888) will remain at Yale University. [The Art Newspaper]

    Rashaad Newsome recalls meeting Shayne Oliver before he was the designer of Hood by Air. A video of Oliver voguing is currently in Newsome’s Studio Museum show. [W Magazine]

    FILM AND VIDEO

    Richard Brody on Chantal Akerman’s films, which are the subject of a Brooklyn Academy of Music retrospective beginning this week: “Her career is a titanic project of personal cinema that redefined the art of filming oneself—of a woman filming herself—yet most of her films remain rare.” [The New Yorker]

    Les Levine at Arthur Ross Architecture Gallery in New York. [Contemporary Art Daily]

    EXTRAS

    The art-book industry continues to boom at the Philadelphia Art Book Fair, which is now in its sixth year. [Philly.com]

    With so many new technologies, is forensic art dying out? [NBC 10]

    A mural celebrating garbage collectors has gone up in Cairo, mysteriously without a problem in a country where censorship can often limit artists. [The New York Times]

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