Event Horizon: Art Happenings Around New York

9 Art Events to Attend in New York City This Week

Martin Creed, Work No. 1701, 2013, digital film, 4 minutes 15 seconds. ©MARTIN CREED

Martin Creed, Work No. 1701, 2013, digital film, 4 minutes 15 seconds.

©MARTIN CREED

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8

Opening: Martin Creed at Park Avenue Armory
In 2001 Martin Creed won the Turner Prize for Work No. 227: The lights going on and off, a work that consisted of just that—an empty room in which the lights turned on and off every five seconds. Creed has become famous for gestures such as this one, which is so minimal it can be genuinely aggravating, even for people who are familiar with Conceptualism and its history. Creed’s work is all about things which don’t last—a room of balloons that will deflate, carefully arranged cacti that will grow to uneven lengths, and so on and so forth. After achieving much fame and furor for works such as these, this Park Avenue Armory show is, rather surprisingly, Creed’s first U.S. survey. In addition to featuring some of his greatest hits, it’ll also include a new film, a small exhibition of 19th- and 20th-century military portraits (Creed collects them), and performances in which the artist will play works from his new album. —Alex Greenberger
Park Avenue Armory, 643 Park Avenue, 2–7 p.m.

Larry Walker, Other Voices - Other Spaces: Urban Spirits, Wall Series, 2007, acrylic and mixed materials on canvas. COURTESY THE ARTIST AND SIKKEMA JENKINS AND CO.

Larry Walker, Other Voices – Other Spaces: Urban Spirits, Wall Series, 2007, acrylic and mixed materials on canvas.

COURTESY THE ARTIST AND SIKKEMA JENKINS AND CO.

THURSDAY, JUNE 9

Opening: Larry Walker at Sikkema Jenkins & Co.
This show acts a survey for the underrated artist Larry Walker, whose 50 years of work have loosely focused on the relationship of individuals to their surroundings. Several dozen works on paper will be on view here, some of which are from Walker’s “Children of Society series,” in which figures appear to dissolve into their backgrounds through abstraction. More recently, Walker has begun producing mixed-medium paintings for his “Wall Series,” which mimics the look of buildings in urban spaces, with torn-off ads and brick-like exteriors. The show’s curator is someone you may know better than Walker himself: his daughter, the artist Kara Walker.
Sikkema Jenkins & Co., 530 22nd Street, 6–8 p.m.

The invitation image from George Henry Longly's "We All Love Your Life" at Red Bull Studios. COURTESY RED BULL STUDIOS

The invitation image from George Henry Longly’s “We All Love Your Life” at Red Bull Studios.

COURTESY RED BULL STUDIOS

Opening: George Henry Longly at Red Bull Studios
With a critically acclaimed solo show at Paris’s Valentin gallery and a pavilion at London’s Serpentine Galleries, British artist George Henry Longly has cemented himself as an up-and-comer. His work is the kind that feels designed to generate press: a fake fashion show, sculptures of nature in vitrines, a perfumed gallery space where disco music plays. And now comes his U.S. debut, a solo show called “We All Love Your Life,” which includes “a variety of experiences alluding to subjectivity in outer space, to the coexistence of classical and digital orders, to self-help and reality television, to seeing the earth from space—to space-age subjectivity,” per a release. These new works are about the body in relation to outside forces; it’ll feature, among other things, a sculpture of Dionysus, a film of snakes, and a webcam.
Red Bull Studios, 220 West 18th Street, 6–9 p.m.

Book Signing: David Deitcher at 192 Books
Writer, critic, and art historian David Deitcher will be signing his latest book, Stone’s Throw, which covers the social, political, and personal contexts that framed the emergence of artist Felix Gonzalez-Torres. In the book, Deitcher describes his friendships with both Gonzalez-Torres and activist curator Bill Olander. Through these memories, the book emphasizes the importance of friendships made during the peak of the AIDS crisis.
192 Books, 192 Tenth Avenue, 5:30–7 p.m.

Talk: Eric Fischl and Rachel Corbett at Skarstedt Gallery
In honor of Eric Fischl’s current solo show, “Rift Raft,” at Skarstedt’s Upper East Side location, the artist will be present for a conversation with Modern Painters executive editor Rachel Corbett. This show, Fischl’s first at this gallery location, investigates interactions that take place within the ostentatious setting of art fairs. A press release states, “Both intrigued and appalled by the concept, he began to visit fairs to observe the crowd, taking his camera with him to capture snapshots of the characters that roam the booths. The figures Fischl paints are not portraits. They represent archetypes of the people at fairs: the shrewd dealers in suits, the eccentric art fans, the wearied group sitting by the refreshment area, almost all of them engrossed in their cell phones.”
Skarstedt Gallery, 20 East 79th Street, 6:30 p.m. RSVP required at skarstedt@culturalcounsel.com

FRIDAY, JUNE 10

Stuart Davis, Report from Rockport, 1940, oil on canvas. ©2016 THE ESTATE OF STUART DAVIS/LICENSED BY VAGA, NEW YORK/THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, EDITH AND MILTON LOWENTHAL COLLECTION, BEQUEST OF EDITH ABRAHAMSON LOWENTHAL, 1991

Stuart Davis, Report from Rockport, 1940, oil on canvas.

©2016 THE ESTATE OF STUART DAVIS/LICENSED BY VAGA, NEW YORK/THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, EDITH AND MILTON LOWENTHAL COLLECTION, BEQUEST OF EDITH ABRAHAMSON LOWENTHAL, 1991

Opening: Stuart Davis at the Whitney Museum
One of the shining examples of American modernism, Stuart Davis was responsible for assigning a recognizable visual language to abstraction that simultaneously harnessed the spirit of modern America. Using a hard-edged advertising style combined with the hallmarks of European avant-garde painting, Davis invented a new form of purely American art: pop culture abstraction. This exhibition encompasses the extent of Davis’s long career that included both the early twentieth century as well as the post-war era. One hundred works will be on view, pairing his later works next to the earlier paintings that inspired them.
Whitney Museum of American Art, 99 Gansevoort Street, 10:30 a.m.–10 p.m.

Premiere: Hannah Black’s Credits at Lisa Cooley
Hannah Black will be present for the premiere of her 2016 video work, Credits, which tackles the idea of debt as it exists through layered historical contexts, especially those of class and race. The film’s wilderness setting—which vaguely refers to Doggerland, the strip of land that once connected Great Britain to Europe—backs a story about contemporary creditor and debtor relationships, touching on our oppressive tendency to publicly shame those who cannot pay their debts.
Lisa Cooley, 107 Norfolk Street, 7 p.m.

SATURDAY, JUNE 11

Screening: Los Angeles Plays Itself at Anthology Film Archives
As part of its week-long Thom Anderson retrospective, Anthology will be screening Los Angeles Plays Itself, a work of documentary film criticism that examines the character of Los Angeles as portrayed in 191 films through the eyes of a native Angeleno. Anderson analyzes the city as it was seen in fantasy, science fiction, film noir, and comedy alike, giving special attention to the way neighborhoods and people of Los Angeles have been both erased and emphasized throughout the last century.
Anthology Film Archives, 32 2nd Avenue, 5:15 p.m.

SUNDAY, JUNE 12

Francis Picabia, Rastadada Painting (Tableau Rastadada), 1920, cut-and-pasted printed paper on paper with ink. ©2016 ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK/ADAGP, PARIS/THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, NEW YORK, GIFT OF ABBY ALDRICH ROCKEFELLER (BY EXCHANGE), 2014

Francis Picabia, Rastadada Painting (Tableau Rastadada), 1920, cut-and-pasted printed paper on paper with ink.

©2016 ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK/ADAGP, PARIS/THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, NEW YORK, GIFT OF ABBY ALDRICH ROCKEFELLER (BY EXCHANGE), 2014

Opening: “Dadaglobe Reconstructed” at Museum of Modern Art
In 1920 Tristan Tzara sent out 50 letters with the help of Francis Picabia. He wanted to create a publication called Dadaglobe, which would bring together work by 50 artists from 10 countries. It would, in other words, solidify Dada as one of the first truly global art movements. (Global, in the sense that involved Europe and North America—this was before Western artists wanted to include people in Asia, Africa, and elsewhere.) It also would have been Tzara’s magnum opus, had it ever been created. Because Tzara’s reach exceeded his grasp, Dadaglobe was never finished, but the artist left behind was some 100 photographs, collages, and drawings, all of which have been brought together for the first time with this show. Works by Marcel Duchamp, Man Ray, Max Ernst, and many others will be united now, in a place Tzara might never have expected: a museum. —Alex Greenberger
Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street, 10:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

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