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Morning Links: The Gospel of Jesus’s Wife Edition

The Gospel of Jesus's Wife. COURTESY WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

The Gospel of Jesus’s Wife.

VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

FAMILY LIFE

A manuscript scrap dated from early Christianity may provide the confirmation that Jesus indeed had a wife, a revelation that could shatter many of the Catholic Church’s tenets regarding sexuality and women’s roles. Unfortunately, the manuscript was probably forged. [The Atlantic]

A man named Scott Leff and his wife are suing the University of Notre Dame for purchasing the stolen American art collection (valued at $575,000) of his father, Jay Leff, from a New Mexico art dealer who in turn bought the collection from Jay’s ex-wife, who allegedly thieved the collection after their divorce. This all happened 20 years ago. [AP]

When the family business is a gallery. [T Magazine]

META

In Arizona, the Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art has debuted a show about itself. Titled “Permanent Collection/Impermanent Museum,” the exhibition “spotlights the physical traces left behind over more than a quarter-century of displaying art.” [AZ Central]

The “world’s fair for digital art” opened last night. [The Creator’s Project]

LAYOFFS

A week after the Corcoran School of the Arts & Design’s class of 2016 graduated, the school announced that it would not be renewing the contracts of more than half of the institution’s full-time staff. [Hyperallergic]

AROUND THE WORLD

David Adjaye’s London-based design firm, Adjaye Associates, has been chosen to design the forthcoming Latvian Museum of Contemporary Art, which will open on November 2021 in Riga. [Dezeen]

Chinese architects are growing increasingly interested in rural projects. [The New York Times]

Zoma Contemporary Art Center in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, a noncommercial gallery founded by Meskerem Assegue and Elias Sime, has become has become one of the most important art institutions in sub-Saharan Africa. [The New York Times]

“Israeli artist Dani Karavan wants his site-specific sculptural relief on the wall of Israel’s Knesset Plenum Hall—where the Israeli government’s legislative branch assembles—to be removed in protest of culture minister Miri Regev’s decision to cut 33 percent of government funding to cultural institutions that won’t hold performances in the West Bank, Negev, and Galilee.” [Artforum]

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