Event Horizon: Art Happenings Around New York

9 Art Events to Attend in New York City This Week

Ronald Lockett, Poison River, 1988, wood, tin, nails, stones, industrial sealing compound, and enamel on wood. American Folk Art Museum. STEPHEN PITKIN, PITKIN STUDIO/COLLECTION OF SOULS GROWN DEEP FOUNDATION

Ronald Lockett, Poison River, 1988, wood, tin, nails, stones, industrial sealing compound, and enamel on wood.

STEPHEN PITKIN, PITKIN STUDIO/COLLECTION OF SOULS GROWN DEEP FOUNDATION

TUESDAY, JULY 19

Panel: “Speaking of Gold and Rust: The Artistic Legacy of Ronald Lockett” at American Folk Art Museum
Until recently, Ronald Lockett was a fairly unknown name to many. But, with an American Folk Art Museum retrospective positioning him as an important artist, Lockett’s legacy needs to be corrected. How did his found objects—typically found plywood, with some added drawings—depict being black and impoverished in the American South? To contextualize Lockett’s work, curator Michael Berube, artist Kevin Simpson, and Christie’s outsider art specialist Cara Zimmerman will discuss the artist’s career.
American Folk Art Museum, 2 Lincoln Square, 6:30 p.m.–8:30 p.m. Tickets $35

Ydessa Hendeles, Partners (The Teddy Bear Project), 2002. ROBERT KENZIERE

Ydessa Hendeles, Partners (The Teddy Bear Project), 2002.

ROBERT KENZIERE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 20

Opening: “The Keeper” at New Museum
From Arman’s shoe accumulations to Mike Kelley’s collection of stuffed animals, art history is riddled with artist-hoarders. But why do artists save things in the first place? What’s with all that junk they may never use again even for, anyway? This show, fittingly titled “The Keeper,” looks artists whose work involves the archiving and collection of objects, whether on purpose or not. Featuring a cut-and-paste anthology of images about LGBTQ art by Henrik Olesen and abstract paintings by Hilma af Klint, this exhibition has as a centerpiece Ydessa Hendeles’s Partners (The Teddy Bear Project), 2002, which includes 3,000 teddy bears, each meant to be like an individual artwork, with its own personal meaning.
New Museum, 235 Bowery, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

Party: Warehouse Sale Kick-Off Party at Printed Matter
Printed Matter is hosting this party to celebrate the beginning of its annual warehouse sale, which typically has some good, cheap finds. As you peruse the books on sale, some of which are almost half off, Momo will perform selections from her debut album, Intl Style, which was released last fall. An invite also notes that refreshments will be served.
Printed Matter, 231 11th Avenue, 6–8 p.m.

Elisabeth Condon, Fear of Life Can Be a Subtle Thing, 2015, acrylic and glitter on linen. COURTESY LESLEY HELLER WORKSPACE

Elisabeth Condon, Fear of Life Can Be a Subtle Thing, 2015, acrylic and glitter on linen.

COURTESY LESLEY HELLER WORKSPACE

Opening: “Splotch” at Lesley Heller Workspace
In the second half of “Splotch,” whose other part is currently on view at Sperone Westwater, there will be more art that, despite its freeform look, has a very calculated process. The show takes its name from Sol Lewitt’s sculpture series, in which fiberglass blobs of color seem to undulate, as though they were organic, living forms. On view in this show, curated by Eileen Jeng, will be work by Lynda Benglis, Walter Biggs, Elisabeth Condon, Nene Humphrey, Andreas Kocks, Sol LeWitt, Riad Miah, Jamie Powell, Taney Roniger, Karen Tompkins, Julia von Eichel, Aaron Williams, Magdalen Wong, and Jian-Jun Zhang.
Lesley Heller Workspace, 54 Orchard Street, 6–8 p.m.

Benefit Reception: “Memory Forms” at Art in General
Taking the loose theme of how memory functions for artists, “Memory Forms” is a group show where every work benefits Art in General. The show includes a pretty nice grouping of artists—it runs the gamut from Alfred Jaar to Xaviera Simmons to Ezra Wube. The show will have a special ticketed benefit reception this week that also includes drinks, music, and opportunities to speak with the exhibited artists.
Art in General, 145 Plymouth Street, Brooklyn, 6–8:30 p.m. Tickets $35

Performances: “It Gets Better IV” at Artists Space
In the third performance program that Stewart Uoo has organized for Artists Space, Shelley Hirsch, Ian Isiah, La’Fem Ladosha, Ashland Mines, and Bailey Stiles will participate. No word yet on what it’s about, but Uoo has a good eye for artists—past performers in his “It Gets Better” series have included K8 Hardy, Juliana Huxtable, and Jacolby Satterwhite—so this seems like a good one.
Artists Space, 55 Walker Street, 7 p.m. Tickets $5

Screening: America Is Hard to See at Brooklyn Academy of Music
Emile de Antonio’s 1970 documentary America Is Hard to See was one of two inspirations for the Whitney Museum’s inaugural show, which took its name from the film and a Robert Frost poem. De Antonio’s film documents Eugene McCarthy’s 1968 campaign for presidency—one that, during the time of the Vietnam War, was able to spur young, liberal voters to action. Shown here on 16mm, the film is rarely screened, and makes for relevant viewing as this election season heats up.
Brooklyn Academy of Music, 30 Lafayette Avenue, 7 p.m. Tickets $14

Still from Robert Frank and Danny Seymour's Cocksucker Blues (1972). ©PROMOTOUR BV

Still from Robert Frank and Danny Seymour’s Cocksucker Blues (1972).

©PROMOTOUR BV

THURSDAY, JULY 21

Screening: Cocksucker Blues at Film Forum
Robert Frank may be best known for his photo-book The Americans, but he also had quite a career as a filmmaker. In 1972, with Danny Seymour, Frank made Cocksucker Blues, a film about The Rolling Stones that was commissioned during their North American tour following the release of Exile on Main Street. Using a vérité style, Frank and Seymour were able to capture rarely-screened footage of the Stones performing such hits as “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction” and “Brown Sugar.” This screening should be nice preparation for BAM’s upcoming Robert Frank films series, which starts in August.
Film Forum, 209 West Houston Street, 9:50 p.m. Tickets $14

Anna Glantz, Waiting for Paul Revere, 2016, oil on canvas. COURTESY THE ARTIST

Anna Glantz, Waiting for Paul Revere, 2016, oil on canvas.

COURTESY THE ARTIST

FRIDAY, JULY 22

Opening: “Daydream from 2013” at Canada
“Hand sanitizers with aloe. Dreams with a breeze. Chicken and waffles. Where were you when you were 22?” This is from the wacky press release for this show, which focuses on fantasies and dreaming. (A tip: don’t read the full press release, if you don’t want the twist ending of Andrei Tarkovsky’s film Solaris to be spoiled.) Curated by Matthew Flaherty, the show will likely feature the surreal, largely figural painting that Canada typically shows. Works by Sam Anderson, Olivia Erlanger, Anna Glantz, Rose Marcus, Alissa McKendrick, Marlie Mul, and Libby Rothfeld will be on view in this show.
Canada, 331 and 333 Broome Street, 6–8 p.m.

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