Event Horizon: Art Happenings Around New York

9 Art Events to Attend in New York City This Week

Christopher Harris, still from Hallimuhfack, 2016. COURTESY THE ARTIST AND MICROSCOPE GALLERY

Christopher Harris, still from Hallimuhfack, 2016.

COURTESY THE ARTIST AND MICROSCOPE GALLERY

MONDAY, JULY 25

Screening: “Christopher Harris: Films & Videos” at Microscope Gallery
Though Florida-based filmmaker Christopher Harris has been making experimental works for about 15 years, he remains little-known, even in the film community. This screening will bring to light a number of film and video works by Harris that “excavate repressed histories and cultural memories,” according to the artist. Eight works by Harris will be shown at this screening, which is followed by a Q&A with the artist himself.
Microscope Gallery, 1329 Willoughby Avenue, #2B, Brooklyn, 7:30 p.m. Tickets $5/$7

TUESDAY, JULY 26

Sophia Al-Maria, still from Black Friday, 2016, digital video projected vertically, color, sound. COURTESY THE THIRD LINE, DUBAI/COLLECTION OF THE ARTIST

Sophia Al-Maria, still from Black Friday, 2016, digital video projected vertically, color, sound.

COURTESY THE THIRD LINE, DUBAI/COLLECTION OF THE ARTIST

Opening: Sophia Al-Maria at Whitney Museum
Sophia Al-Maria has never had a solo show in the United States, so her name isn’t very well-known in America. But, like last year’s Rachel Rose show, the American-Qatari artist and poet’s Whitney exhibition will probably be a surprise hit. Al-Maria was previously a member of GCC, the collective known for its odd videos that compare the Gulf area with digital technology. Now on her own, her work will retain that strange, almost science-fictional quality. Using what she calls “Gulf Futurism,” Al-Maria will look at the roles of malls in the Gulf, where objects—and foreign cultures—are exchanged. A new video, Black Friday, will explore how malls are treated like sacred places in the area; it will be accompanied by The Litany, an installation of looped videos doomed to have no purpose, like discarded consumer objects. —Alex Greenberger
Whitney Museum, 99 Gansevoort Street, 10:30 a.m.–6 p.m. Installation is free of charge and does not require museum admission

Talk: Patricia Cronin and Maura Reilly at FLAG Art Foundation
At this talk, artist Patricia Cronin will discuss her current show at the FLAG Art Foundation with curator Maura Reilly. Cronin’s FLAG show, “Shrine for Girls, New York,” is an installation that was initially shown at the 2015 Venice Biennale. In it, piles of clothes on wood crates represent various exploited women—hijabs symbolize the 276 girls that Boko Haram kidnapped in 2014, for example. Though specifically referring to events around the world, the works also more universally allude to the abused, “fallen women,” in the artist’s words, that appear in almost every country, on every continent.
FLAG Art Foundation, 545 West 25th Street, 9th Floor, 6–8 p.m. RSVP to RSVP@flagartfoundation.org

Opening: Brandi Twilley at Sargent’s Daughters

Though Brandi Twilley’s paintings seem at first glance to represent life as it really is, there’s always something slightly off about them. In her latest series, titled “The Living Room,” Twilley recreates images of her childhood house burning down using information from Google searches, dreams, and her own memory. While there’s always a realist attention to her details—a sharply painted lick of a flame, a remarkably detailed bedroom—it’s hard to call them reality in any way. As everyone knows, memory has a way of changing how we view the past, and these works are proof that traumatic events tend to morph in our minds, blurring the way reality is experienced.
Sargent’s Daughters, 179 East Broadway, 6–8 p.m.

Alix Pearlstein, Interiors, 1996, still from video. COURTESY ELECTRONIC ARTS INTERMIX (EAI), NEW YORK

Alix Pearlstein, Interiors, 1996, still from video.

COURTESY ELECTRONIC ARTS INTERMIX (EAI), NEW YORK

WEDNESDAY, JULY 27

Screening: “ ‘Edited at EAI’: Restless Generation” at Electronic Arts Intermix
This screening program features four videos by women who created performances specifically for the camera. Borrowing techniques from early ’70s performance artists, and combining them with an ’80s distaste for consumer culture, these women looked at bodies, gender, and sex in an era when video had become more available than ever, thanks to the advent of MTV and public access television. Videos by Vanessa Beecroft, Alix Lambert, Kirsten Mosher, Alix Pearlstein, and Beverly Semmes will be screened in this program.
Electronic Arts Intermix, 535 West 22nd Street, 6:30 p.m. RSVP to info@eai.org

THURSDAY, JULY 28

Opening: “good news.” at Josée Bienvenu Gallery
This group show focuses on artists who deal with the nature of information of all kinds, be it in the form of data, or as JPEGs online. Featuring both well-known and new names, this show features work by Ricardo Alcaide, Abdulaziz Ashour, Ernesto Caivano, Darío Escobar, Fernanda Fragateiro, Simryn Gill, Anne Lindberg, Yuri Masnyj, Julianne Swartz, Yuken Teruya, Rirkrit Tiravanija & Tomas Vu, and Adam Winner.
Josée Bienvenu Gallery, 529 West 20th Street, 6–8 p.m.

Book Swap and Reception: Black Art Incubator at Recess
In this social sculpture organized by Taylor Renee Aldridge, Jessica Bell Brown, Kimberly Drew, and Jessica Lynne, visitors are asked to interact in various with projects designed to promote work by black artists. This week at the Black Art Incubator, visitors can participate in a book swap by bringing something to the library and then taking something from it. By exchanging books, a form of knowledge, gallery-goers help spread the word about black art and authors. The book swap, which is presented in collaboration with the Bruce High Quality University, will also double as a reception for the project.
Recess, 41 Grand Street, 6–8 p.m.

Teiji Furuhashi, Lovers, 1994, computer controlled, five-channel laser disc/sound installation with five projectors, two sound systems, two slide projectors, and slides (color, sound). ©2016 DUMB TYPE/THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, NEW YORK, GIFT OF CANON INC., 1998

Teiji Furuhashi, Lovers, 1994, computer controlled, five-channel laser disc/sound installation with five projectors, two sound systems, two slide projectors, and slides (color, sound).

©2016 DUMB TYPE/THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, NEW YORK, GIFT OF CANON INC., 1998

SATURDAY, JULY 30

Opening: Teiji Furuhashi at Museum of Modern Art
As part of a rehang of MoMA’s post-1980 galleries, Teiji Furuhashi’s installation Lovers will be put back on view for the first time ever since it debuted at the museum in 1995. In the installation, a computer controls video projections of Furuhashi and other members of the collective Dumb Type dancing around the walls of a gallery. Made one year before the Japanese artist died of AIDS-related causes, the installation explores the meaning of gestures and romance in a time when intimacy was changing.
Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street, 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

SUNDAY, JULY 31

Performance and Panel: Martha Wilson at Smack Mellon
Over the years, Martha Wilson has performed as various political figures, from Barbara Bush to Nancy Reagan. Now she can add to that list the Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump, whose persona Wilson will “invade,” in her words. After the performance, Isabella Cruz-Chong, Alicia Grullón, Kate Sopko, Maria Miranda, and Erin Donnelly will discuss how art can be a form of political intervention.
Smack Mellon, 92 Plymouth Street, Brooklyn, 3 p.m.

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