Morning Links

Morning Links: The Oprah Makes It Rain Edition

The one, the only: Oprah.COURTESY CREATIVE COMMONS

The one, the only: Oprah.

COURTESY CREATIVE COMMONS

The Business

Oprah Winfrey reportedly made more than $60 million from the sale of a Klimt painting she bought in 2006 and turned last year. The private deal, according to Katya Kazakina, was brokered by Larry Gagosian for a Chinese buyer. [Bloomberg]

Gabriel Orozco built a fully operational convenience store inside Kurimanzutto gallery in Mexico City—complete with cash registers and candy shelves stocked with Nerds. [The New York Times]

In 2017, the arts are a $5.5 billion industry in Texas—a record-high for the state—going by arts-related travel, tourism, and jobs. [Dallas News]

Right-wing protesters in Dresden disrupted the unveiling of a monumental artwork alluding to Aleppo by the Syrian-German artist Manaf Halbouni. [The Art Newspaper]

Turn a Page

Nicolas Jaar, noted electronic-music maker (and son of Alfredo Jaar), is publishing an artist book with Printed Matter. [Resident Advisor]

Dead Is Better, a zine with morbid inclinations by Team Gallery operative Alissa Bennett, will move into its third installment at this month’s L.A. Art Book Fair. [The New York Times]

Inspiration

Nan Goldin on her love for the work of Ed van der Elsken and photography as a “sublimation of sex,” among other things. [The New Yorker]

Graffiti goes into the list of ingredients for paintings and neon works by Los Angeles artist Patrick Martinez, whose visual sense of his hometown has been seasoned through the years. [Los Angeles Times]

Sudarshan Shetty, curator of the Kochi-Muziris Biennial, talks about the thinking behind an exhibition pitched in the “grey space between fact and mythmaking.” [Harper’s Bazaar Arabia]

On View

After years at a natural history museum and a botanic garden, “orchids: A MOMENT” is now on show at the Hirshhorn Museum in Washington, D.C. (you know it’s in an art museum because of the iconoclastic capitalization). [Smithsonian]

Pictures of a scantily clad Emily Ratajkowski—the model/actress who made her name in the music video for “Blurred Lines”—feature in a show at Castor Gallery in New York. Photographer Jonathan Leder is not concerned about the many ethical questions raised. [Page Six]

 

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