Event Horizon: Art Happenings Around New York

9 Art Events to Attend in New York City This Week

Eva Zeisel, Cloverware Bowl, designed ca. 1947, produced by the Clover Box and Manufacturing Company, New York, Plexiglas. “Partners in Design: Alfred H. Barr and Philip Johnson,” at Grey Art Gallery.

RICHARD P. GOODBODY/THE MONTREAL MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, THE LILIANE AND DAVID M. STEWART COLLECTION, GIFT OF THE DESIGNER

TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 4

Performance: Matana Roberts at Madison Square Park
Multimedia artist, musician, and composer Matana Roberts will premiere a new work, . . . Breath . . ., which will blend video, graphics, and music to create an interactive sound environment in Madison Square Park. Roberts refers to her sonic assemblages as “panoramic soundquiliting,” a shorthand of sorts for the dense narrative-driven explorations of American music that she conjures. For the duration of her Blank Forms residency in the midst of Josiah McElheny’s public-art piece Prismatic Park, she will invite others to collaborate on the creation of work in a kind of open-studio environment. Roberts will be in the park every day through Saturday, September 9, and then will perform the results of her undertaking at Roulette on September 14.
Madison Square Park, 11 Madison Avenue, 11 a.m.–4 p.m., free

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 6

Opening: “Partners in Design: Alfred H. Barr and Philip Johnson” at Grey Art Gallery
This exhibition celebrates the fruitful partnership between the Museum of Modern Art’s first director, Alfred H. Barr, and the architect Philip Johnson, who founded the museum’s architecture department. The story of how this pair helped spread modern design will be told through the display of more than 100 pieces of furniture, photographs, and industrial and graphic-design works. Arranged chronologically, the show will trace the pair’s journey from making the Bauhaus famous to the making of “Modern Architecture,” a lauded 1932 show that helped make design a mainstay in MoMA’s exhibition program.
Grey Art Gallery, 100 Washington Square East, 6–8 p.m.

Jordan Casteel, Harold, 2017, oil on canvas.

JASON WYCHE/COURTESY THE ARTIST AND CASEY KAPLAN, NEW YORK

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 7

Opening: Jordan Casteel at Casey Kaplan
For her first exhibition at Casey Kaplan, New York–based artist Jordan Casteel will present a series of large-scale oil paintings of men she photographed while wandering the streets of Harlem. Like most of Casteel’s work, her new paintings—introspective and given largely to subjects seated in their natural environments—address relationships between individuals and the spaces they live in, often touching on issues related to class and race in the process.
Casey Kaplan, 121 West 27th Street, 6–8 p.m.

Opening: Maya Lin at Pace Gallery
“I’ve always been fixated on water,” Maya Lin has said. “Maybe it’s because it exists in multiple states, and you can never understand it in nature as a fixed moment in time.” With this exhibition, Lin will present nine new installations and sculptures that, using materials including recycled silver, glass marbles, and steel pins, map water patterns in locations as disparate as the Nile River and the Arctic. In each work, Lin attempts to depict a natural world in flux. Flows North (2017), for example, recreates a drawing of a waterway, its form remaining unstable.
Pace Gallery, 537 West 24th Street, 6–8 p.m.

Eliza Douglas, Anne Imhof, Untitled, 2017, silkscreen and oil on canvas.

COURTESY THE ARTISTS AND GALERIE BUCHHOLZ, BERLIN/COLOGNE/NEW YORK

Opening: Eliza Douglas and Anne Imhof at Galerie Buchholz
Since 2016, Eliza Douglas and Anne Imhof, both of whom are based in Frankfurt, Germany, have collaborated on performative works, most notably Imhof’s 2017 Venice Biennale piece Faust, which featured Douglas and others, and wound up earning Imhof the Golden Lion. This two-person show will feature a series of paintings by the artists, who are also a couple, including a work that appears to feature the two artist’s signatures on top of one another.
Galerie Buchholz, 17 East 82nd Street, 6–8 p.m.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 8

Opening: Trevor Paglen at Metro Pictures
Through collaborations with software developers and computer scientists, Berlin-based artist Trevor Paglen has spent the past several years investigating artificial intelligence and computer vision, the process by which machines recognize faces and people. The results of that effort, a series of prints and videos Paglen calls “invisible images,” will be on show for the first time at Metro Pictures. Machine-Readable Hito, for example, involved Paglen feeding hundreds of images of fellow artist Hito Steyerl through a facial-recognition algorithm. The result is a digital portrait of Steyerl that includes information beside it such as her age, gender, and emotional state.
Metro Pictures, 519 West 24th Street, 6–8 p.m.

Trevor Paglen, It Began as a Military Experiment, 2017, set of ten pigment prints, glossy finish.

COURTESY THE ARTIST AND METRO PICTURES, NEW

Opening: Sam Falls at Galerie Eva Presenhuber
Los Angeles–based artist Sam Falls has worked in many modes over the course of his career, with output in the realms of photography, painting, and public installation. With his new show, he returns to painting. He will show works made in upstate New York that were first dyed in natural clay pools and then left in the woods through rainstorms, creating a distressed look similar to that of his abstract photographs. Alongside the paintings will be new ceramic works made by pressing plants into wet tiles.
Galerie Eva Presenhuber, 39 Great Jones Street, 6–8 p.m.

Barbara Chase-Riboud, Malcolm X #14, 2017, bronze with black patina, silk, wool and polished cotton with steel support.

COURTESY THE ARTIST AND MICHAEL ROSENFELD GALLERY, NEW YORK

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 9

Opening: Barbara Chase-Riboud at Michael Rosenfeld Gallery
In 1969, Barbara Chase-Riboud attended the Pan-African Cultural Festival in Algeria. Inspired by a sense of global struggle against systems of oppression and the political rhetoric of Malcolm X, Chase-Riboud produced her first bronze and fabric sculpture in tribute to the slain human rights leader. Drawing on loans from private collectors and museums from around the world, this exhibition will bring together 14 large-scale sculptures of the kind that Chase-Riboud continued to produce for the next 50 years. Alongside these loans will be new steles produced for the exhibition. One is Malcolm X #14 (2017), a black rectangular structure with bent bronze pieces and knotted wool elements.
Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, 100 11th Avenue, 6–8 p.m.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 10

Memorial: Vito Acconci at Brooklyn College
Among his various pursuits, Vito Acconci, who died at age 77 this past April, dedicated some of his time to lecturing M.F.A. students at Brooklyn College. In tribute to his teaching career, the college will be holding a memorial, which is free and open to the public—with refreshments, video and slide projections, and an open mic for anyone wanting to share some words about the late, great performance artist.
Brooklyn College Library Room, Room 411, 2900 Bedford Avenue, Brooklyn, 1–3 p.m.

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