Event Horizon: Art Happenings Around New York

9 Art Events to Attend in New York City This Week

Claudia Martínez Garay, The Leftovers, 2016, mixed media.

ARTURO KAMEYA/COURTESY THE ARTIST AND GINSBERG GALERÍA, LIMA, WITH SUPPORT BY RIJKSAKADEMIE VAN BEELDENDE KUNSTEN, AMSTERDAM

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 13

Exhibition: 2018 New Museum Triennial at New Museum
The fourth New Museum Triennial takes as its theme art’s role in communities and the ways it structures political debates. The 28 artists included in the show, which is curated by New Museum curator Gary Carrion-Murayari and Institute of Contemporary Art, Miami deputy director and chief curator Alex Gartenfeld, “offer models for dismantling and replacing the political and economic networks that envelop today’s global youth.”
New Museum, 235 Bowery, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14

Exhibition: “William Eggleston: Los Alamos” at Metropolitan Museum of Art
In William Eggleston’s portfolio “Los Alamos” (1965–74), reds blaze, blues simmer, and greens pop. Eggleston takes banal subjects—a woman at a diner, an airplane flier stirring a cocktail, a car parked in front of an advertisement—and elevates them to the status of high art, mainly through a sharp sense of composition and a clever, pioneering use of color. On view will be some 75 works from the series, which was donated to the museum by collector Jade Lau. Included among the pieces is Untitled, Memphis (1965), an image of a boy pushing a shopping cart—Eggleston’s first-ever color photograph.
Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 5th Avenue, 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

Barkley L. Hendricks, Sidecard #1 (For Miles), 1979, graphite, glow stick, ink, blue seal foil, and collage on paper.

©ESTATE OF BARKLEY L. HENDRICKS/COURTESY THE ARTIST’S ESTATE AND JACK SHAINMAN GALLERY, NEW YORK

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 15

Opening: Barkley L. Hendricks at Jack Shainman Gallery
Less than a year after Barkley L. Hendricks’s death, a series of works on paper—the first of their kind to ever be shown—will comprise this show, “Them Changes,” at Jack Shainman Gallery. The instantly recognizable, honest quality of the figures Hendricks painted manifest in the drawings through intense colors and a pristine attention to detail. They share something in common with his portraits, which often depict black sitters using a decidedly naturalistic style. Some of the discovered works incorporate x-rays, here intended as a way to give a glimpse inside the artist’s process.
Jack Shainman Gallery, 513 West 20th Street, 6–8 p.m.

Opening: Nicole Eisenman at Anton Kern Gallery
This exhibition, “A Valentine’s Day Show,” runs for ten days only, and will feature two dozen drawings and three paintings. The ink, watercolor, and pencil works depict Eisenman’s friends in the seaside setting of Fire Island. Though these works are playful, they also have a serious underpinning: they explore what kinds of love make their way into the public eye. What better way to celebrate Valentine’s Day?
Anton Kern Gallery, 16 East 55th Street, 6–8 p.m.

Paul Chan, Pillowsophia (after Pope Offred), 2017, nylon and fan.

COURTESY THE ARTIST AND GREENE NAFTALI, NEW YORK

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 16

Opening: “Walking Point” at Greene Naftali
This group exhibition ponders the relationship between violence and art-making today, or, as a release puts it, how “the contemporary militarized state shapes our perception of war and implicates us in its ongoing production.” It’s heady stuff, and it will be examined using a variety of mediums and styles. Included in the exhibition are Pope.L, who is known for his performances and sculptures about identity, and Rachel Harrison, whose hodgepodge sculptures combine art-historical allusions with political messages. Also in this show are Paul Chan, Dan Flavin, Tetsumi Kudo, Lee Lozano, and Martin Wong, among others.
Greene Naftali, 508 West 26th Street, 6–8 p.m.

Opening: India Salvör Menuez at Picture Room
At this show, artist, actress, and curator India Salvör Menuez, who most recently appeared in the Amazon TV series I Love Dick, will debut “Sittings,” a collection of etchings. The portraits were each made in single sittings where Menuez drew her subjects into copper plate; they were then printed using the chine-collé technique, known for accentuating fine details. In stripping away the environment that each person is depicted in, Menuez is able to highlight the direct and unique relationship between herself and the subject.
Picture Room, 117 Atlantic Avenue, Brooklyn, 6–8 p.m.

Alex Da Corte, Good Window with Candle (Purple), 2018, neon, vinyl siding, laminate, plywood, epoxy clay, house paint, and hardware.

COURTESY THE ARTIST AND KARMA, NEW YORK

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 17

Opening: Alex Da Corte at Karma
The name of Alex Da Corte’s upcoming show at Karma, “C-A-T Spells Murder,” is cribbed from the tagline of the R. L. Stine book Cat, which itself was part of the author’s larger teenage horror series “Fear Street.” For this exhibition, Da Corte will craft the kind of sensory-engulfing interiors for which he is known–previous shows have used tools including but not limited to sculpture, neon, video, painting and even scent. The exhibition comes accompanied with a book of the same name, edited by Da Corte and the artist Sam McKinniss, that features 24 scary essays and short stories from the likes of Al Bedell, Kaitlin Phillips, and Bob Nickas.
Karma, 188 East 2nd Street, 6–8 p.m.

Opening: Charles Garabedian at Betty Cuningham
Before passing away in 2016 at the age of 92, the late Armenian-American painter Charles Garabedian spent his career making the kind of colorful, cartoon-informed figurative paintings that have crept into vogue among young artists over the past few years. His first posthumous show at the gallery will have on display over five decades of work, and takes its title–“Harlow’s Back!”–from Jean Harlow, the earliest painting to be shown in the exhibition. Expect a rich selection of work informed as much by the artist’s inner life as his own personal history, with pieces alluding to Garbedian’s Armenian heritage and his longtime home of Los Angeles.
Betty Cuningham, 15 Rivington Street, 4–6 p.m.

DIVA TV, Like a Prayer (still), 1989.

COURTESY INTERFERENCE ARCHIVE

Talk: “Video Activism from the 1960s to the Present” at Interference Archive
For this screening and discussion, the author Chris Robé will present a history of video activism that tracks over five decades of dissent. Robé, who is the author of Breaking the Spell: A History of Anarchist Filmmakers, Videotape Guerrillas, and Digital Ninjas, will start with primitive analog footage sourced from street tapes and public access television and move into more recent video from groups like ACT UP and the Zapatistas. The second part of the program focuses on contemporary global actions as documented on the internet. This street-level footage will share space with more experimental and traditional short-form documentaries. Taken together, the screening explores the many forms and textures of radical video.
Interference Archive, 314 7th Street, Brooklyn, 7 p.m.

Copyright 2018, Art Media ARTNEWS, llc. 110 Greene Street, 2nd Fl., New York, N.Y. 10012. All rights reserved.

  • Issues