Event Horizon: Art Happenings Around New York

9 Art Events to Attend in New York City This Week

Avery Singer, The Studio Visit, 2012.

COURTESY THE ARTIST AND GAVIN BROWN’S ENTERPRISE, NEW YORK/ROME

MONDAY, MAY 21

Talk: “The Love of Painting” at Artists Space
Art historian and critic Isabelle Graw’s latest book, The Love of Painting: Genealogy of a Success Medium, focuses on the medium’s long history and its place within the contemporary-art landscape. Alongside musings about 14th-century painting theory and other historical topics, the book includes interviews with artists working today. At this talk, Graw will discuss her new book, and David Joselit, a professor of art history at the City University of New York’s Graduate Center, and Avery Singer, a New York–based painter, will also offer insights on Graw’s subject.
Artists Space, 55 Walker Street, 7 p.m. Tickets $5

TUESDAY, MAY 22

Talk: Senga Nengudi at Dia Art Foundation
As part of the Dia Art Foundation’s ongoing “Artists on Artists” talks series, Senga Nengudi, who is best known for her sculptural and installations, will discuss Joan Jonas’s artistic practice and her legacy as a performance-art pioneer. The talk promises a fascinating look at the ways in which Jonas’s medium has evolved since the 1970s and 1980s, as well as musings on the similarities between two artists’ work, which often deals with female bodies and their relationship to various spaces.
Dia:Chelsea, 535 West 22nd Street, 6:30 p.m. Tickets $6/$10

Students attending a Freedom School, Mississippi, 1964. “The Black School x Kameelah Janan Rasheed” at the New Museum.

KEN THOMPSON

WEDNESDAY, MAY 23

Exhibition: The Black School x Kameelah Janan Rasheed at New Museum
For the 2018 edition of its annual social justice residency and exhibition, the New Museum will present work by artist Kameelah Janan Rasheed and professors Joseph Cuillier and Shani Peters, of the Black School, an experimental art center that uses black history as a tool for activism and political change. The exhibition offers two spaces for learning and creating: a classroom for art-making workshops—built by the Black School and inspired by Freedom Schools and the Black Panthers’ Liberation Schools—and an installation by Rasheed with objects, a video, a library filled with the artist’s research materials, and a Xerox machine.
New Museum, 235 Bowery, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

Opening: Xaviera Simmons at Hunter’s Point South Park
The third artwork commissioned through SculptureCenter’s art education program Public Process, Convene by Xaviera Simmons is a sculptural installation situated along the East River in Hunter’s Point South Park crafted from aluminum canoes. The vessels are painted with abstract designs that recall the patterns and colors of national flags, and Simmons has said the project will grapple with ideas around migration, borders, and travel. Like much of Simmons’s output, the installation will allude to the various histories that become tangled together to form people’s identities.
Hunter’s Point South Park, Long Island City, 6–8 p.m.

A pre-installation design of Xaviera Simmons’s Convene, 2018.

COURTESY THE ARTIST AND DAVID CASTILLO GALLERY, MIAMI

Talk: Hilton Als and Laurie Anderson at Paula Cooper Gallery
In her new book Laurie Anderson: All the Things I Lost in the Flood, the experimental composer and artist offers a look at the past four decades of her practice, including information about never-before-seen artworks. Anderson’s conversation with New Yorker theater critic Hilton Als will touch on her new tome, as well as their thoughts on visual art, music, and the ingredients for poignant and compelling cultural criticism.
Paula Cooper Gallery, 521 W 21st Street, 7 p.m. Free with purchase of Anderson’s book

THURSDAY, MAY 24

Exhibition: Alexis Smith at Garth Greenan Gallery
This show, titled “Hello Hollywood,” focuses on mixed-media collages created by Alexis Smith during the 1970s and 1980s. As the exhibition’s title suggests, the works often deal with the mythology surrounding Los Angeles, which is both the place of the artist’s birth and current residence. In the show’s titular installation, two rows of palm trees are set in the gallery alongside roadside advertisements for the now-defunct company Burma Shave, creating an ad-hoc version of a classically Southern Californian landscape.
Garth Greenan Gallery, 545 West 20th Street, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

Alexis Smith, Your Name Here, 1975, mixed media.

COURTESY THE ARTIST AND GARTH GREENAN GALLERY, NEW YORK

Opening: Sheila Hicks at Sikkema Jenkins & Co.
This solo exhibition features new and recent work by the artist Sheila Hicks, and it will include a selection of pieces that were featured in her recent Centre Pompidou exhibition. There will be a series of panels wrapped in linen and acrylic yarns, which, when shown in Paris, were rested against a window and could be viewed from the front or back. Neither painting nor sculptures, these works are perfect examples of Hicks’s tough-to-define, alluring yarn pieces.
Sikkema Jenkins & Co., 530 West 22nd Street, 6–8 p.m.

Bodys Isek Kingelez, Africanisch, 1994, paper, paperboard, plastic, and other various materials.

KLEINEFENN/PRIVATE COLLECTION, PARIS

FRIDAY, MAY 25

Opening: Manuela Soto at Lubov
The artist Manuela Soto is perhaps best known for her work as a tattoo artist, where she trades in poppy, anime-informed figures and the iconography of Los Angeles Chicanx culture. Her forthcoming show at Tribeca exhibition space Lubov focuses on Soto’s drawing-and-stencil works, and includes a selection of images by the artist that often deal with the superficial aesthetics of the culture of today’s youth.
Lubov, 373 Broadway, #207, 6–9 p.m.

SATURDAY, MAY 26

Exhibition: Bodys Isek Kingelez at Museum of Modern Art
The late Congolese artist Bodys Isek Kingelez created repurposed sculptures from a kaleidoscopic range of found materials—everything from soda cans and colored paper to commercial packaging supplies. The detailed, ornate works blend the architectural and the fantastical, and often end up looking a bit like a Sim City recreation come to life. Their utopian landscapes run counter to the artist’s own experience growing up in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. This is the first full U.S. retrospective of Kingelez’s work; it spans his full career and will includes rarely seen works.
Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street, 10:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

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