Event Horizon: Art Happenings Around New York

9 Art Events to Attend in New York City This Week

Naufus Ramírez-Figueroa, Life in His Mouth, Death Cradles Her Arm (still), 2016, single-channel video.

COURTESY THE ARTIST; MENDES WOOD DM; PROYECTOS ULTRAVIOLETA, GUATEMALA CITY; AND SIES + HÖKE, DUSSELDORF

TUESDAY, JUNE 5

Opening: Sheida Soleimani at CUE Art Foundation
In her confrontational and oftentimes humorous photography series“Medium of Exchange,” Sheida Soleimani examines power, exploitation, and oil in works that feature queer models wearing masks of Western leaders and ministers of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). In vibrant solo and group portraits, figures pose with money- and oil-related props and engage in various activities suggestive of corruption. The images to be shown here display Soleimani’s unique ability to unite scathing political commentary and comedy by way of art.
CUE Art Foundation, 137 West 25th Street, 6–8 p.m.

Sheida Soleimani, Former Vice President and Secretary of State, United States & Halliburton CEOs, 2017, archival pigment print.

COURTESY THE ARTIST AND CUE ART FOUNDATION

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 6

Exhibition: Naufus Ramírez-Figueroa at New Museum
“The House at Kawinal,” Naufus Ramírez-Figueroa’s first solo exhibition in the U.S., will present a video performance piece, Life in His Mouth, Death Cradles Her Arm (2016), along with new sculptures. Ramírez-Figueroa’s work is often concerned with the history that informs the political and social climate of Guatemala today. The show borrows its title from the Mayan city of Kawinal, whose late Mayan ruins were destroyed by the flooding of the nearby Chixoy Hydroelectric Dam. The construction of that same dam is also closely linked to the displacement and massacre of thousands of Achi Mayan people. In this new installation, the artist’s figurative pieces evoke the visceral fragmentation experienced by indigenous families and communities as a result of these violent events.
New Museum, 235 Bowery, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

Opening: Hugh Steers at Alexander Gray Associates
Hugh Steers is best known for his figurative compositions of intimate domestic scenes that address the impact of AIDS. The artist once described his work as “gorgeous bleakness,” noting its uncanny balance of happiness, loneliness, and anguish. “The Nullities of Life,” a new show of Steer’s work in Chelsea, takes its title from a New York Times review of a Vincent van Gogh biography that Steers felt encapsulated his paintings’ raison d’être. Steers himself died of AIDS-related causes at age 32, and this exhibition showcases his equally tender, disquieting, and personal works from the late 1980s and early 1990s.
Alexander Gray Associates, 510 West 26th Street, 6–8 p.m.

Paul Chan, Dimposium, 2016, nylon, fans, fabric, and rug. “Evidence,” Metro Pictures.

COURTESY THE ARTIST, GREENE NAFTALI, NEW YORK, AND METRO PICTURES, NEW YORK

THURSDAY, JUNE 7

Opening: “Evidence” at Metro Pictures
“Evidence,” a group exhibition organized by artist Josh Kline, brings together work by Paul Chan, Oto Gillen, Kline, Gloria Maximo, Liz Magic Laser, Paul Pfeiffer, and Allyson Vieira. The show’s focus is twofold, as participating artists consider issues of class inequality as well as increased capabilities to manipulate truth through altering images, videos, and sounds. From Gillen’s haunting photographs of One World Trade Center to Kline’s sculptural portraits of service staff workers, the works featured in the exhibition are diverse in terms of subjects and stylistic approaches.
Metro Pictures, 519 West 24th Street, 6–8 p.m.

Opening: Claudia Martínez Garay at Grimm Gallery
Following a showing in the New Museum Triennial earlier this year, Claudia Martínez Garay, whose practice explores impacts of colonialism, will stage her first solo exhibition in the U.S. under the title “I WILL OUTLIVE YOU.” The show comprises a video, ÑUQA KAUSAKUSAQ QHEPAYKITAPAS / I WILL OUTLIVE YOU (2017), and an installation of ceramics and paintings. The video examines the archetype of the prisoner and, ultimately, the anthropomorphizing of artwork into a sentient, trapped, self-conscious being. The objects on display complement the narrative in the video, raising questions about individualism, collectivism, and transformation.
Grimm Gallery, 202 Bowery, 6–8 p.m.

Claudia Martínez Garay, … imaywanpas quidakuwakmi … / … but you can stay with my stuff …, 2017, installation with ceramic (fired and raw: red, black and white clay, porcelain, plaster, wood, iron and bricks) and paintings.

COURTESY THE ARTIST AND GRIMM GALLERY

FRIDAY, JUNE 8

Exhibition: Alberto Giacometti at Guggenheim Museum
For the first extensive American museum exhibition devoted to the seminal Swiss modernist Alberto Giacometti in 15 years, the Guggenheim has assembled a blockbuster that features more than 175 sculptures, paintings, and drawings. The show will include historical photographs and rarely-seen plaster sculptures alongside more celebrated figurative work like the 1949 sculpture The Nose, which hangs and traps an elongated bronze facial cast in a steel cage.
Guggenheim Museum, 1071 Fifth Avenue, 10 a.m.–5:45 p.m.

Mary Corse, Untitled (Octagonal Blue), 1964, metal flakes in acrylic on canvas.

©MARY CORSE/COURTESY KAYNE GRIFFIN CORCORAN, LOS ANGELES; LEHMANN MAUPIN, NEW YORK; AND LISSON GALLERY, LONDON

Exhibition: Mary Corse at Whitney Museum
Mary Corse was one of only a handful of women to emerge as part of the mid-1960s Light and Space movement, and her Whitney show will be her first-ever institutional survey. Unlike many of her West Coast peers, among them Larry Bell and Robert Irwin, Corse has explored matters of light through abstract painting and other means. A selection of her 1960s “White Light” works—which include glass particles fused with white paint—will be included here alongside works that incorporate fluorescent tubes.
Whitney Museum, 99 Gansevoort Street, 10:30 a.m.–10 p.m.

Performance: “Dance and Progress” at the Kitchen
Active for over two decades, “Dance and Process” is the longest-running series at the venerable performance space the Kitchen. The program showcases new works made by way of a ten-week process of collaboration and critique between choreographers and artists. This night of happenings will feature a piece facilitated by the choreographers Moriah Evans and Yve Laris Cohen and executed by the artists Lauren Bakst, NIC Kay, Athena Kokornis, and Angie Pittman.
The Kitchen, 512 West 19th Street, 8 p.m. Tickets $12/15

Vanessa Rondón, Victor & Harold, 2013, archival pigment print. “Daybreak: New Affirmations in Queer Photography,” Leslie-Lohman Museum.

COURTESY THE ARTIST

SATURDAY, JUNE 9

Exhibition: “Daybreak: New Affirmations in Queer Photography” at Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art
This group exhibition showcases 12 up-and-coming photographers whose work explores queer identity through a variety of approaches, often with a pronounced sense of intimacy. Ryan Duffin’s portraits share space with work by Palestinian multimedia artist Elias Jesús Rischmawi and the Bronx-based photographer Groana Melendez, who uses family albums as source material alongside performances that occur in front of her camera. A connective thread running through many of the artists on view is a desire to synthesize personal and political concerns.
Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art, 26 Wooster Street, 12–6 p.m.

Correction 6/17/18, 12:30 p.m.: An earlier version of this article misstated the name of an artist in the Leslie-Lohman Museum’s “Daybreak” exhibition. The name of the Palestinian multimedia artist included in the exhibition is Elias Jesús Rischmawi, not R. Elias Jesus Rischamawi. The post has been updated to reflect this.

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