Morning Links

Morning Links: Giacometti Fever Edition

Alberto Giacometti painting in his Paris studio, 1958.

ERNST SCHEIDEGGER/©2018 STIFTUNG ERNST SCHEIDEGGER–ARCHIV, ZURICH

Fair Enough

For ARTnews, Judd Tully reports on the action at the VIP opening of Art Basel, where early sales racked up in the wake of a buoyant market. [ARTnews]

ARTnews also asked some Basel locals to highlight places to see—and artworks to check out—when not busy at the fair. [ARTnews]

T Magazine assembled two veteran New York gallerists (Paula Cooper and Sean Kelly) and two younger ones (Bridget Donahue and Elyse Derosia) to discuss the state of the art market today. Art fairs come in for special consideration. [T Magazine]

Saying “No”

Jason Farago writes on this year’s Berlin Biennale, which he praises for its focus and its small scale. “This biennial,” he notes, “is serious, low-temperature and rather distant; an insider’s show, and one that takes almost too much pleasure in saying ‘no.’ ” [The New York Times]

The Guardian profiled the White Pube, a duo composed of Zarina Muhammad and Gabrielle de la Puente that publishes pithy on-the-fly reviews of art exhibitions. Muhammad recalled one review of a Marguerite Humeau show, which she didn’t like. “I wasn’t having a good time of it,” she said, “and I took it out on the art.” [The Guardian]

Checks and Balances

The Creative Independent surveyed 1,016 artists about their financial stability, with findings released in a new report. Asked to grade how stable they are on a scale of 1 to 10, a large percentage of respondents said they were a 5. [The Creative Independent]

According to a new report partly published by the Dutch broadcaster AT5, former Stedelijk Museum curator Beatrix Ruf did not have conflicts of interest during her tenure at the institution. The report notes that she conducted her business “in the spirit of the rules.” [Artnet News]

Darkness

The Queer Biennial in Los Angeles may bear the seemingly happy title “What If Utopia,” but a sense of sadness and fear permeates much of the work on view. According to biennial director Ruben Esparza, this is the point—many in the LGBTQI+ community have to deal with a “dark cloud” that haunts them. [L.A. Weekly]

On the Docket

The art world seems to be having a case of Alberto Giacometti fever, with a retrospective for the scupltor on view at the Guggenheim Museum and a two-person show featuring his work and Francis Bacon’s at the Fondation Beyeler. And the interest in Giacometti won’t flag any time soon: the artist’s Parisian studio will open to the public later this month. [The New York Times]

London’s Rodeo gallery will open a second location, in Piraeus, Greece. A solo exhibition of work by Leidy Churchman will inaugurate the space next Monday. [Artforum]

The Castello di Rivoli in Turin, Italy, and the Whitechapel Gallery in London are planning a Michael Rakowitz survey for next year. And it’s not the only exciting project Rakowitz has coming up: he also wants to rid Cleveland of the color orange for a work in the city’s upcoming triennial. [The Art Newspaper]

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