Event Horizon: Art Happenings Around New York

9 Art Events to Attend in New York City This Week

Martin Wong, Traffic Signs for the Hearing Impaired (stop sign), 1990, aluminum.

COURTESY THE ESTATE OF MARTIN WONG AND P.P.O.W.

TUESDAY, JULY 17

Talk: “Between the Adhoc and the Accidental” at Swiss Institute
In conjunction with “Readymades Belong to Everyone,” the inaugural exhibition at its new space in the East Village, the Swiss Institute will host a conversation with Nathan Silver, a writer and architect, and Eva Díaz, associate professor of history of art and design at the Pratt Institute. Moderated by Martino Stierli, chief curator of architecture and design at MoMA, the talk will focus readymades and the roles that accidents, ad hoc incidents, and architecture and design play in their creation as art objects.
Swiss Institute, 38 St. Marks Place, 7 p.m. Free with RSVP to rsvp@swissinstitute.net

Concert: Will Lang Presents Randy Gibson’s The Third Pillar at Areté
Musician Will Lang will perform a long-duration work for trombone and sine waves by the minimalist composer and multimedia artist Randy Gibson in a newly updated installation environment enlisting light. Musically, the show will feature the three-hour composition The Third Pillar in Primal Imperfect Palindrome with The Souvenir of The Second Pillar, The Floating Cirrus over the Pumping Slush, and The Highes Moving Chordal Motif from the Apparitions of The Four Pillars, which debuted at the Avant Music Festival in 2012. Environmentally, the setting will be an immersive light work titled Quadrilateral Starfield Symmetry A:A RGB Base 9:162.
Areté, 67 West Street, #103, Brooklyn, 7 p.m. Tickets $15

WEDNESDAY, JULY 18

Screening: Moonrise Kingdom at Hauser & Wirth
As part of a curated rooftop screening program of films selected by artists on its roster, Hauser & Wirth will show Wes Anderson’s Moonrise Kingdom (2012), which was picked by Amy Sherald. (The artist, who painted Michelle Obama’s official portrait, just recently joined the gallery’s slate.) The movie traces the story of two preteen lovers who, during a summer in New England, run away from their respective worlds.
Hauser & Wirth, 548 West 22nd Street, 6—10 p.m.

Barbara Hammer (with Ingrid Christie, camera), What You Are Not Supposed to Look At #5, 2014, chromogenic prints, Mylar, and X-ray collage. “Multiply, Identify, Her,” at the International Center of Photography.

LOU BANK/©BARBARA HAMMER/COURTESY THE ARTIST AND COMPANY GALLERY, NEW YORK/COLLECTION FLORRIE BURKE

Talk: “Dismantling the Gaze” at International Center of Photography
This talk between the artists Leah Stranger and Rafia Santana is part of the first session of the International Center of Photography’s new series “Dismantling the Gaze,” which, according to the institution, “considers looking, power, and visual culture in the #MeToo moment.” Stranger and Santana’s discussion will center around strategies for overturning gendered conventions and will draw from experiences in their own practices, which involve the notion of split or multiplied identities. Their work can currently be glimpsed in the ICP’s exhibition “Multiply, Identify, Her.”
ICP Museum, 250 Bowery, 6:30 p.m.

Screening: Kenneth Anger at Seward Public Library
The Lower East Side’s Seward Park Library will present a trilogy of short films by the groundbreaking experimental filmmaker Kenneth Anger, who is known for work that explores sexuality and the occult, often with an interest in popular cultural. (Anger was profiled in ARTnews’s Spring 2016 issue.) On tap is one of the artist’s most famous films, Scorpio Rising (1963), in which the iconography of the American motorcyclist is abstracted through the use of montage. Also screened here will be Kustom Kar Kommandos (1965) and the ritualistic Eaux d’ Artifce (1953).
Seward Park Library, 192 East Broadway, 6:30 p.m.

Thomas Bayrle, Bierrakete (Beer Rocket), 1969, silkscreen print on cardboard.

WOLFGANG GÜNZEL

THURSDAY, JULY 19

Talk: “Social Fabric: Thomas Bayrle’s Expanded Network” at New Museum
With a survey of the seminal German artist Thomas Bayrle on view in its galleries, the New Museum has assembled a panel of contemporary artists fascinated by Baryle’s output, including Lena Henke, Jacolby Satterwhite, and Jordon Wolfson. Moderated by the art historian and critic Alex Kitnick, the talk will likely touch on Bayrle’s use of technology, which portended future developments in digital culture through the use of then-burgeoning midcentury technologies like the photocopy machine.
New Museum, 235 Bowery, 7 p.m. Tickets $10/15

FRIDAY, JULY 20

Exhibition: Louise Nevelson at Whitney Museum
“The Face In the Moon: Drawings and Prints by Louise Nevelson” was conceived to represent aspects of Nevelson’s output other than her wood sculptures. In her prints and paper collages, Nevelson made use of paper, foil, fabric and other objects, and combined them to create semi-abstract compositions. Her concern, in many of the works, was the body—one drawing in the show features layered, semi-transparent women’s forms with a pair of eyes superimposed over them.
Whitney Museum, 99 Gansevoort Street, 10:30 a.m.–10 p.m.

Constantin Brancusi, The Cock, 1924, cherry.

©2018 ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK AND ADAGP, PARIS/THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, NEW YORK

SUNDAY, JULY 22

Exhibition: Constantin Brancusi at Museum of Modern Art
“Don’t look for obscure formulas or mystery in my work,” Constantin Brancusi once said. It was perhaps the most telling remark ever made about the artist’s sculptures, which are often intended to be basic and elegant in their form, representing animals and concepts through small arches and thin rods. For this exhibition, the Museum of Modern Art assembled eleven of Brancusi’s sculptures alongside photographs, films, and drawings by the artist.
Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street, 10:30 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

SUNDAY, JULY 22

Opening: Alexander Shchurenkov at Vacation
This month, Vacation gallery, a space conceived to be shared with out-of-town venues, will host Moscow’s Fragment Gallery. A show featuring work by the Russian artist Alexander Shchurenkov will explore the concepts of memory and memorization through pieces crafted from materials like garbage bags and fishing nets. The artist intends for the pieces to feel like remembrances that becomes more fuzzy the more one tries to retain or retrieve it—“ ‘traps’ of perception,” as he has put it.
Vacation, 24A Orchard Street, 6–9 p.m.

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