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David Kordansky Gallery Now Represents Huma Bhabha and Lauren Halsey

Installation view of “Huma Bhabha, We Come in Peace,” 2018, the Roof Garden Commission, at The Metropolitan Museum of Art.

HYLA SKOPITZ, FOR THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART/©HUMA BHABHA/COURTESY THE ARTIST, SALON 94, NEW YORK, AND DAVID KORDANSKY GALLERY, LOS ANGELES

Los Angeles’s David Kordansky Gallery has added artists Huma Bhabha and Lauren Halsey to its roster.

Bhabha is a New York–based sculptor whose rooftop installation at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, “We Come in Peace,” closed at the end of last month. That exhibition presented two large-scale figures that faced each other: one, a standing alien-like creature with a blue torso and red head; the other, a prostrate being almost completely covered by a black tarp. The installation is emblematic of her practice, which draws from ancient and contemporary sources like science fiction, and imbues what might seem weird—or other—at first glance with pathos, strength, and resilience.

Noting that he has long followed Bhabha’s work, dealer David Kordansky told ARTnews in an email that he is “fascinated by her synthesis of artificial and organic materials, modernism and monsters, notions of the universal and the alien. Both topical and transcendent, her forms give unexpected—and unflinching—life to the figurative tradition.”

Bhabha currently has a solo exhibition at the Contemporary Austin in Texas, and a survey of her work will open at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston next March. Bhabha will also continue to be represented by New York gallery Salon 94.

Lauren Halsey, The Crenshaw District Hieroglyph Project (Prototype Architecture), 2018, installation view at the Hammer Museum, Los Angeles.

BRIAN FORREST/COURTESY THE HAMMER MUSEUM, LOS ANGELES AND DAVID KORDANSKY GALLERY, LOS ANGELES

Halsey is an L.A.-based artist whose contribution to the Hammer Museum’s 2018 Made in L.A. biennial won its $100,000 Mohn Award. That work, titled Crenshaw District Hieroglyph Project (Prototype Architecture) and installed in the museum’s outdoor balcony space, is a monument to the people and places of the artist’s neighborhood, where her family has lived for generations. The work, which will be constructed in the area in 2020, is a continuation of Halsey’s practice of creating site-specific works that involve community engagement. She also created an installation for L.A.’s Museum of Contemporary Art earlier this year.

“Lauren also boldly engages the otherworldly and the everyday, though significantly with a critical eye to the past and future of L.A.,” Kordansky said. “I’ve always sought to represent the most exciting work coming out of our city, and Lauren is it. Her boundless practice excavates the realities and myths of her hometown of South Central L.A.”

“Since its founding, I’ve envisioned the gallery as a platform for highly individualistic, often idiosyncratic voices that reflect our time,” Kordansky added. “No dogma guides the program, but a sincere interest in presenting each singular vision with rigor and passion, and a desire to evolve the story of art in L.A.”

An expansion of his gallery, designed by the architecture firm wHY, is set to be completed by next summer, and will bring the gallery’s exhibition space to some 7,000 square feet.

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