Event Horizon: Art Happenings Around New York

9 Art Events to Attend in New York City This Week

Andy Warhol, Ethel Scull 36 Times, 1963, silkscreen ink and acrylic on linen, thirty-six panels.

©THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS, INC. AND ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS) NEW YORK/ WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART, NEW YORK; JOINTLY OWNED BY THE WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART AND THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 12

Exhibition: Andy Warhol at Whitney Museum
The largest-ever exhibition to focus on a single artist at the Whitney’s location in the Meatpacking District, “Andy Warhol—From A to B and Back Again” brings together some 350 works of art. Tracing the artist’s career from the 1940s to the 1980s, the retrospective features Warhol’s commercial illustrations, Pop works, readymade abstractions, and experimental pieces in various mediums. The show situates the artist as an enduring influence in today’s cultural landscape, and aims to offer a more radical reexamination of some of his work, with an eye toward the role gender and sexuality play in Warhol’s legacy.
Whitney Museum, 99 Gansevoort Street, 10:30 a.m.—6 p.m. Timed tickets that include museum admission must be purchased for entry

Anna Maria Maiolino, Untitled, from the series “Filogenéticos” (Phylogenetics), 2018, acrylic ink on paper.

EVERTON BALLARDIN/©ANNA MARIA MAIOLINO/COURTESY THE ARTIST AND HAUSER & WIRTH

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14

Opening: Anna Maria Maiolino at Hauser & Wirth
Anna Maria Maiolino’s latest solo show, “ERRÂNCIA POÉTICA (POETIC WANDERINGS),” will include more than 50 sculptures, drawings, paintings, photographs, and videos. Each work is part of the Brazilian artist’s ongoing explorations of sexuality, language, and mortality. A new site-specific unfired clay installation, which is part of Maiolino’s “Terra Modelada (Modeled Earth)” series, will also be on view. In conjunction with the show, Hauser & Wirth Publishers is releasing a book with 74 drawings from her “Entre Pausas (Between Pauses)” series, a group of abstractions that the artist initially began producing when she was on breaks as a textile worker; some of these works will be on display in the gallery.
Hauser & Wirth, 548 West 22nd Street, 6—8 p.m.

Opening: Amar Kanwar at Marian Goodman Gallery
This show features just one work: Amar Kanwar’s 85-minute film installation Such a Morning (2017), which premiered at Documenta 14 in Athens and Kassel, Germany. The piece focuses on an unnamed mathematics professor who quits his job and takes up residence in an abandoned train car. Without any dialogue, the film tells the story this man’s story through intertitles and letters, and surveys the ways in which humans grapple with tumultuous and grim realities today.
Marian Goodman Gallery, 24 West 57th Street, 6—8 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 14

Pablo Gómez Uribe, Family’s Manifest, 2018, clay.

COURTESY THE ARTIST AND PROXYCO

Opening: Pablo Gómez Uribe at Proxyco
Bricks play a major role in the work of Pablo Gómez Uribe. Some 200 of these symbolically loaded units of matter comprise one work in “All That Is Solid,” his exhibition at Proxyco. The piece, Tridimensional Palimpsest, traces the “architectural memory” of one of the artist’s former floor plans. Elsewhere, a new work by the New York–based artist repurposes banged-up bricks that were sent out for industrial testing.
Proxyco, 168 Suffolk Street, 6–8 p.m.

Performance: Twyla Tharp at the Joyce Theater
“Twyla Tharp: Minimalism and Me” features works made by the choreographer and dancer between 1965 and 1971, with a focus on the pieces’ relationship to contemporaneous Minimalist art movements. Tharp is known for creating perhaps the first crossover ballet, 1973’s Deuce Coup, which included music by the Beach Boys, and has worked with the likes of Robert Wilson and Philip Glass. Members of her company will recreate portions of dances predating that piece, starting with 1965’s Tank Dive and running through 1971’s Eight Jelly Rolls, a dance for six to music by Jelly Roll Morton. In a New York Times profile, Tharp said that, as she was crafting the latter performance, she set out to redefine dance.
The Joyce Theater, 175 Eighth Avenue, 7:30 p.m. Tickets $56

Installation view of “Agnes Martin / Navajo Blankets,” 2018, at 229 Hamilton Ave, Palo Alto.

JOHNNA ARNOLD/©2018 ESTATE OF AGNES MARTIN AND ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK/COURTESY PACE GALLERY

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15

Talk: “Agnes Martin / Navajo Blankets” at Pace Gallery
This exhibition, which was previously shown at Pace Gallery’s space in Palo Alto, California, pairs seven large paintings by Agnes Martin with a series of first-generation Navajo blankets. Martin spent a good deal of her life in New Mexico, where she took inspiration from the region’s local craft communities, and this exhibition explores the aesthetic crossovers between her work and theirs. After opening the show this Wednesday, Pace will host a panel discussion featuring art historian and Martin biographer Nancy Princenthal, cultural anthropologist Ann Lane Hedlund, and forth-generation Navajo artist Melissa Cody. Curator Candice Hopkins will moderate.
Pace Gallery, 537 West 24th Street, 6:30–8 p.m.

Opening: Norman Lewis at Michael Rosenfeld Gallery
Some of the later painter Norman Lewis’s paintings can be glimpsed in the Brooklyn Museum’s “Soul of a Nation” exhibition, where his work appears alongside similar abstractions made by other members of the short-lived Spiral group. This show, “Looking East,” aims to provide further context. For Lewis, abstraction was inherently political, and he was often known to represent current events, such as civil rights movement protests, using allusive geometries and colors. The artist once said, “one of the things in my own self education was the discouraging fact that painting pictures of protest didn’t bring about any change.” The exhibition looks at how Lewis’s research into non-Western art informed his practice.
Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, 100 11th Avenue, New York, 6–8 p.m.

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 16

Opening: Dawn Kasper at David Lewis
For the Venice Biennale in 2017, Dawn Kasper set up a studio for six months and created music using a drum set, maracas, a keyboard, and other tools. “It’ll be kind of like, a little loose and fluid and drone-y and fun,” she told ARTnews at the time. Information about the contents of her latest exhibition, titled “Four Scores (Zero to Nothing),” is spare: the gallery released a teaser image featuring a cloth floating down a river. But the show will include a series of four performances on Fridays during the show’s run, with Kasper in collaboration with painter James Krone; filmmaker, photographer, and performance artist Andrew Lampert; filmmaker Jeff Preiss; and composer, performer, and contemporary harpist Zeena Parkins.
David Lewis Gallery, 88 Eldridge Street, 6–8 p.m.

Still from Wang Bing’s ‘Til Madness Do Us Part (2013).

COURTESY ICARUS FILMS

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 17

Screening: ’Til Madness Do Us Part at Metrograph
Wang Bing, one of the most important artists and filmmakers in China today, is getting the retrospective treatment this month at two New York film venues—the Film Society of Lincoln Center and Metrograph. The latter’s series kicks off with a screening of his 2013 documentary ’Til Madness Do Us Part, which follows the patients of a mental facility. Set in the Yunnan province of China, which is home to many ethnic minorities, this film, like many others by Wang, seeks to bring light to a community typically not represented in contemporary Chinese cinema. Wang himself will be present for a Q&A after the screening.
Metrograph, 7 Ludlow Street, 4 p.m. Tickets $15

Correction 11/13/18, 11:05 a.m.: An earlier version of this article stated that misstated Anna Maria Maiolino's nationality. She is Brazilian, not Argentinian. The post has been updated to reflect this.

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