Event Horizon: Art Happenings Around New York

9 Art Events to Attend in New York City This Week

Frank Henderson (Hinono’eiteen/Arapaho), Man and Two Women (Henderson Ledger Artist B), ca. 1882, pencil, colored pencil, and ink on paper.

THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART, NEW YORK, GIFT OF CHARLES AND VALERIE DIKER, 1999

MONDAY, DECEMBER 3

Exhibition: “Artistic Encounters with Indigenous America” at Metropolitan Museum of Art
This exhibition traces the history of Indigenous North Americans as depicted in European and American art through more than 40 works drawn from the Met’s holdings. The show will attempt to express how these often-fraught images helped perpetuate stereotypes and aided in disadvantaging Native peoples. To complement the works on view, the Met invited the artist Wendy Red Star (Apsáalooke/Crow) to create wall text.
Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 Fifth Avenue, 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 4

Screening: “Andy Warhol at Judson” at Museum of Modern Art
In conjunction with MoMA’s exhibition devoted to Judson Dance Theater, this program will focus on the ways in which experimental dance impacted Andy Warhol’s life and work (itself the subject of a retrospective on view at the Whitney). The Pop artist often attended Judson Dance Theater concerts, and it was at one such event that he met dancer Fred Herko, who would later become his muse. MoMA will show screenings of a selection of films made by Warhol, including newly digitized reels of Herko, a film titled Jill And Freddy Dancing (1963), and screen tests with Judson members including choreographer Lucinda Childs and lighting designer Billy Linich.
Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street, 7:30 p.m. Tickets $15

Andy Warhol, Jill and Freddy Dancing (still), 1963, 16mm film.

ORIGINAL FILM ELEMENTS PRESERVED BY THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART COLLECTIONS OF THE ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM, PITTSBURGH, AND THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, NEW YORK. CONTRIBUTION THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS, INC.

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 5

Performance: Moriah Evans at the Kitchen
Configure, a new piece by choreographer Moriah Evans, is part of the artist’s ongoing exploration of what she has called “intimate movement.” Evans has said that the work—which she will perform with dancers Lizzie Feidelson, Nicole Mannarino, Lydia Okrent, and João dos Santos Martins—is “a visceral interrogation of what it means to be or to have a body today.” Live music by Ka Baird will figure in the performance.
The Kitchen, 512 West 19th Street, 8 p.m. Tickets $25

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6

Opening: “At Home: In the American West” at Aperture Foundation
This group exhibition brings together portrait photography captured across the American West. Photographers at different points in their careers—including Texas Isaiah, Ricardo Nagaoka, the duo of Ahndraya Parlato and Gregory Halpern, and others—traveled around the region and interviewed people about what home means to them. Some of the varied and intimate images also feature in the California Sunday Magazine’s new special photography issue, which is themed “home.”
Aperture Foundation, 547 West 27th Street, 6—8:30 p.m.

Texas Isaiah, Teira Church, Los Angeles, CA, 2018. “At Home: In the American West.”

COURTESY THE CALIFORNIA SUNDAY MAGAZINE AND APERTURE

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6

Opening: Maria Antelman at Pioneer Works
Among the four installations in this two-floor show by New York artist Maria Antelman is Disassembler, a video work co-produced by the National Museum of Contemporary Art in Athens, Greece. Named after a computer-code translation tool, the piece focuses on the effects of automation in the workplace. Also included will be The Wild West (2017), Stones Make The Rivers Move (2016), and Darth Vader (2014).
Pioneer Works, 159 Pioneer Street, 7-9 p.m.

Screening: Harun Farocki at Film Society of Lincoln Center
As part of the Film Society of Lincoln Center’s retrospective of Christian Petzold, whose new movie Transit is soon to be released, this program will present two documentaries by one of the director’s biggest influences: the late German experimental filmmaker Haring Farocki. In his essayistic films, Farocki often uses dark, dry humor to examine corporate culture. His 1997 film The Interview focuses on German job application courses, while 2004’s Nothing Ventured trains its eye on venture capitalism.
Film Society of Lincoln Center, 165 West 65th, 6:30 p.m. Tickets $12/15

Marc Chagall, Self-Portrait with Easel, 1919, gouache on paper.

©ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK AND ADAGP, PARIS/PRIVATE COLLECTION

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 6

Talk: Bella Meyer at Jewish Museum
Art historian Bella Meyer will give a talk here about her grandfather, the artist Marc Chagall, whose work is currently at the Jewish Museum alongside that of El Lissitzky and Kazimir Malevich in an exhibition about the early 20th-century avant-garde in Vitebsk, Russia. Meyer’s lecture will focus on Chagall’s time as Fine Arts Commissar in Vitebsk and as the founder of the People’s Art School. Her personal recollections of the artist and his art will be interspersed with meditations on Chagall’s place in art history.
Jewish Museum, 1109 5th Avenue, 6:30 p.m. Tickets $12/$15/$18

Annette Peacock.

ALASTAIR THAIN

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 7

Concert: Annette Peacock at First Unitarian Congregational Society
Annette Peacock’s music, beginning in the 1960s, is known for exploratory sounds and distinctive vocals influenced by jazz, pop, rock, and electronic music. For this rare concert, co-presented by Artists Space and Blank Forms, the artist will be mixing her voice with piano, keyboard, and drum machine. According to a statement, Peacock sees the spiritual venue as an “intimate, beautiful environment. The acoustics are marvelous. Music is sacrament to me. It’s my religion. And the Unitarian church accepts and supports all forms of belief and worship.”
First Unitarian Congregational Society, 119 Pierrepont Street, Brooklyn, 8 p.m. Tickets $26/$35/$40/$100

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 8

Performance: “Skeleton Architecture: An Evening of Performance” at Danspace Project
After staging two workshops—one for “Black folks ONLY” and the other open to all—the collective Skeleton Architecture will stage a capstone performance at Danspace Project to mark the end of a residency there. Skeleton Architecture is a Bessie award–winning group of black women and gender non-conforming performers whose art highlights the lives and stories of the African diaspora. Audiences will be invited to pair collaborative discussion with the artists’ movements in an experience that makes use of “improvisation, dance, song, text, and spirit,” according to a release.
Danspace Project, 131 East 10th Street, 7 p.m. Tickets $5/$10

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