Event Horizon: Art Happenings Around New York

9 Art Events to Attend in New York City This Week

Adelita Husni-Bey, Chiron (production still), 2018 video.

COURTESY THE ARTIST

TUESDAY, JANUARY 22

Exhibition: Adelita Husni-Bey at New Museum
In her first institutional solo show in New York, artist Adelita Husni-Bey, whose work previously appeared in the 2017 Venice Biennale and the 2018 edition of the Museum of Modern Art’s “New Photography” show, will present a new video installation titled Chiron (2019). The piece focuses on an organization that provides pro-bono legal representation to undocumented immigrants in New York, and it explores the social impacts of U.S. foreign policy. A selection of the artist’s past films will also figure in the site-specific installation.
New Museum, 235 Bowery, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

Opening: Antonio Dias at Galeria Nara Roesler
This exhibition marks the U.S. debut of Ta Tze Bao (1972), a 14-part installation by Antonio Dias, who died this past August. The work is from Dias’s series on the Watergate scandal, and it is named for the “big character posters”—wall-mounted flyers with propagandist statements written in a large font—from China’s Cultural Revolution. Ta Tze Bao comprises front pages of the New York Times and the Italian newspaper Corriere della Sera from the week of Richard Nixon’s reelection screen-printed onto Chinese paper. The show is the first solo presentation in New York for Dias.
Galeria Nara Roesler, 22 East 69th Street, 3r, 6–8 p.m.

Lucio Fontana, Spatial Environment in Red Light, 1967/2019, painted wood, glass tubes, neon, and mixed media.

©2019 FONDAZIONE LUCIO FONTANA, ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK, AND SIAE, ROME; RECONSTRUCTION AUTHORIZED BY FONDAZIONE LUCIO FONTANA – PROJECT PIRELLI HANGARBICOCCA, 2017

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 23

Exhibition: Lucio Fontana at Met Breuer and Metropolitan Museum of Art
“On the Threshold,” the first U.S. Lucio Fontana retrospective in more than 40 years, will feature sculptures, paintings, drawings, and environments made by the artist between 1931 and 1968. Fontana is known as the founder of the Spazialismo movement, and some of his most famous works—including a 1958 series of lacerated paintings called the “Tagli” (Cuts)—will figure in the show. At the Met’s Fifth Avenue home, a reconstruction of Fontana’s arabesque Neon Structure for the Ninth Milan Triennial (1951) will be among the works on view.
Met Breuer, 945 Madison Avenue, 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m.; and Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 5th Avenue, 10 a.m.–9 p.m.

Margherita Manzelli, 26.05.2014 Ravenna, 2014, graphite, liquid watercolor, glitter, and glue on paper.

COURTESY THE ARTIST AND LEHMANN MAUPIN, NEW YORK, HONG KONG, AND SEOUL

Talk: Banu Cennetoğlu at SculptureCenter
The Turkish-born artist Banu Cennetoğlu’s first solo exhibition in the U.S. is currently on view at SculptureCenter, and it includes a 128-hour video documenting the artist’s life over the past 12 years, since she moved back to her home country after stints in New York, Paris, and Amsterdam. The piece is made up of images and videos exclusively taken from electronic devices the artist has owned dating back to 2006, and serves as both a personal, political, and technological history. At this event, Cennetoğlu will be on hand to discuss the work with critic Kaelen Wilson-Goldie.
SculptureCenter, 44-19 Purves Street, Queens, 7 p.m.

THURSDAY, JANUARY 24

Opening: Margherita Manzelli at Lehmann Maupin
The Milan-based artist Margherita Manzelli trades in figurative paintings and drawings that focus on fictional women characters. Her debut solo exhibition at Lehmann Maupin will continue her inquiry into how pictures can represent female personae. Her new works, which take the form of paintings and drawings, focus specifically on stereotypes for women, and aim to subvert them in various ways.
Lehmann Maupin, 536 West 22nd Street, 6–8 p.m.

FRIDAY, JANUARY 25

Exhibition: Robert Mapplethorpe at Guggenheim Museum
Three decades after the death of the controversial, influential artist Robert Mapplethorpe, the Guggenheim will honor his legacy with a yearlong exhibition in two parts. The first part will feature highlights from the Guggenheim’s Mapplethorpe holdings, which include early Polaroids, photographs of the S&M underground, and some of his more famous self-portraits. The second section, which will open at the museum in July, will showcase a younger group of contemporary artists who either directly reference or were inspired by his work.
Guggenheim Museum, 1071 5th Avenue, 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m.

Robert Mapplethorpe, Untitled (Self Portrait), 1973, six dye diffusion transfer prints (Polaroids), in painted plastic mounts and acrylic frame.

©ROBERT MAPPLETHORPE FOUNDATION, USED BY PERMISSION/SOLOMON R. GUGGENHEIM MUSEUM, NEW YORK

Talk: “Why the Indigenous Today?” at Museum of Modern Art
At this talk, which is presented by the Patricia Phelps de Cisneros Research Institute for the Study of Art from Latin America, speakers Mariana Botey, an artist, curator, and UC San Diego associate professor, and Michele Greet, associate professor at George Mason University, will discuss museums’ sudden interest in Indigenous art. The talk, the first in a two-part series, will be called “Indigenism and Modernity in Latin America” and aims to offer a contemporary perspective on Indigenous communities in Latin America.
Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street, 6:30 p.m. Free with RSVP to cisnerosinstitute_rsvp@moma.org with “INDIGENISM” in the subject line

SATURDAY, JANUARY 26

Performance: Sable Elyse Smith at the Kitchen
Sable Elyse Smith, whose work focuses on issues of racial and queer identity, politics, and perception, takes the role of curator and performer in her upcoming “C.R.E.A.M.” production at the Kitchen, which is organized in conjunction with High Line Art. Named after the eponymous Wu-Tang Clan song, the event features Jibabe-Khalil Huffman, Simone White, Devin Kenny, Bonita Oliver, A. H. Jerriod Avant, and Smith, who will be doing a poetry reading. Each performance and reading promises to “dismantle and reimagine ‘C.R.E.A.M.’ as a song and as a larger cultural moment,” according to a news release. “The contributors thus interrogate mass incarceration and shed light on the interrelationship between violence, intimacy, and trauma, to pursue what exists beyond those broken narratives.”
The Kitchen, 512 West 19th Street, 4 p.m. This event is sold out, but the Kitchen will offer an in-person wait list

Concert: Wadada Leo Smith at Lincoln Center
Acclaimed trumpeter and composer Wadada Leo Smith will this week star in a live performance of his visual album America’s National Parks at the Lincoln Center. His five-member avant-garde jazz band will perform alongside projected images of locales like Yellowstone National Park and of historical figures like Eileen Southern, the late musician and scholar who became the first black woman tenured at Harvard University. A pre-concert talk will take place one hour before both performances.
Lincoln Center, 10 Lincoln Center Plaza, 7 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. Consult website for pricing information

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