Event Horizon: Art Happenings Around New York

9 Art Events in New York This Week: Josephine Meckseper, Ian Cheng, Luchita Hurtado, and More

Josephine Meckseper, PELLEA[S] (still), 2018.

©JOSEPHINE MECKSEPER/COURTESY THE ARTIST AND TIMOTHY TAYLOR, LONDON AND NEW YORK

TUESDAY, JANUARY 29

Screening: Josephine Meckseper at the Kitchen
In conjunction with the artist’s show at Timothy Taylor gallery, the Kitchen will present a screening of Josephine Meckseper’s new film PELLEA[S]. The work features footage from the 2017 U.S. Presidential inauguration and the subsequent Women’s March, and it draws on playwright Maurice Maeterlinck’s Pelléas et Mélisande, which debuted in 1893 and follows three characters trapped in a love triangle. A conversation with Meckseper will follow the screening.
The Kitchen, 512 West 19th Street, 6:30 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 30

Opening: “Vista View” at Galerie Buchholz
Curated by artist Caleb Considine, “Vista View” focuses on abstracted landscapes, with work by a cross-generational grouping of artists including Ginny Bishton, Agnes Martin, Mohammad Nasrallah, Daniela Ortiz, Ben Shahn, Ulla Wiggen, and more. Paintings figure prominently, but drawings, prints, and mixed media works will also be on view.
Galerie Buchholz, 17 East 82nd Street, 6–8 p.m.

Luchita Hurtado, Untitled, ca. 1940s, oil on canvas.

JEFF MCLANE/©LUCHITA HURTADO/COURTESY THE ARTIST AND HAUSER & WIRTH

THURSDAY, JANUARY 31

Opening: Luchita Hurtado at Hauser & Wirth
Luchita Hurtado is having a moment, following an appearance in the 2018 edition of the Hammer Museum’s Made in L.A. biennial, where her paintings of women’s bodies earned rave reviews. Ahead of a solo for her at the Serpentine Galleries in London later this year, Hauser & Wirth, which just added the artist to its roster, will stage “Dark Years,” a survey of Hurtado’s work from the 1940s and ’50s that takes its name from a self-portrait dating from around 1945 rendered in brownish tones. On view will be abstractions and early works by the Venezuelan-born artist, who is 98 years old.
Hauser & Wirth, 32 East 69th Street, 6 p.m.

Ian Cheng, BOB, 2018, artificial lifeform.

COURTESY THE ARTIST AND GLADSTONE GALLERY, NEW YORK AND BRUSSELS

Opening: Ian Cheng at Gladstone Gallery
Following his show at MoMA PS1 in 2017, Ian Cheng returns with a premiere of a new work: BOB (Bag of Beliefs), the first piece in a series of what the artist has called “artificial life forms.” BOB, which takes the form of a computer-generated serpentine creature, will learn and change as a result of its experiences over the exhibition’s run. The project considers the ways in which belief systems and external influences can impact a single being, and viewers around the world can interact with it through an iOS application called BOB Shrine. Also included in this show will be Cheng’s production drawings from the development of BOB.
Gladstone Gallery, 530 West 21st Street, 6–8 p.m.

Opening: Wilmer Wilson IV at Susan Inglett Gallery
Wilmer Wilson IV was one of the breakout stars of the 2018 New Museum Triennial, where he showed a series of works made by applying staples to low-resolution photographs. His first New York solo show will include more of these stapled photo-portraits, as well as large-scale ink drawings and blurry photographs that Wilson snapped while moving at a fast pace. By obscuring the views of his subjects, Wilson asks viewers to question the norms of portraiture.
Susan Inglett Gallery, 522 West 24th Street, 6–8 p.m.

Wilmer Wilson, RID UM (detail), 2018, staples and pigment print on wood.

COURTESY SUSAN INGLETT GALLERY, NEW YORK

Opening: Michelle Stuart at Galerie Lelong & Co.
Taking its title from her 2016 work Flight of Time, a piece that combines found photography and the artist’s own images to create a wide-ranging view of nature, this show presents a series of drawings, photographs, and sculptures representing more than 40 years of work by New York artist Michelle Stuart. (Flight of Time, which appeared in the 2017 Venice Biennale, will be shown here for the first time in America.) Anchoring the show is a new work, These Fragments Against Time, that brings together photography, sculptural forms, and found objects in an attempt to offer a portrait of sorts of earth and the cosmos.
Galerie Lelong & Co., 528 West 26th Street, 6–8 p.m.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 1

Screening: I Heard It Through the Grapevine at Metrograph
To complement the group show “God Made My Face: A Collective Portrait of James Baldwin” at David Zwirner gallery, Hilton Als has curated a mini-survey of films about Baldwin for Metrograph. Kicking off the series is I Heard It Through the Grapevine, a 1982 film by Pat Hartley and Dick Fontaine that features Baldwin discussing life experiences and visiting the writer Amiri Baraka. Als will be on hand to introduce the screening.
Metrograph, 7 Ludlow Street, 7:30 p.m. Tickets $15

Claire Falkenstein, The Boa Constriction, ca. 1980, driftwood, paint, and copper.

COURTESY MICHAEL ROSENFELD GALLERY LLC, NEW YORK

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 2

Opening: “Art of Defiance: Radical Materials” at Michael Rosenfeld Gallery
This group exhibition brings together a mix of living and deceased women artists who all share a common interest in surfaces, textures, and combinations of unconventional materials. Included is Betye Saar, whose influential mixed-media assemblages meditate on issues related to identity and race in America. Her works will be shown alongside the abstract metal and glass sculptures of Claire Falkenstein and wood-and-leather sculptures of heads by Nancy Grossman.
Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, 100 11th Avenue, 5–7 p.m.

Concert: Mark Ernestus’ Ndagga Rhythm Force at Pioneer Works
Mark Ernestus was a founding member of the influential Berlin minimal-techno duo Basic Channel, which established a spacial, dub-informed take on dance music that throbbed more than banged. In the years since, he has delved deeply into reggae and African music, and here he teams up with a lively configuration of musicians who specialize in sabar, a traditional drum-heavy sound from Senegal. The result is a mesmerizing meld of earthy rhythmic sounds and electronic textures that creates an otherworldly air. As a bonus, this concert with the full group—presented by the performance platform Blank Forms—follows one that was cancelled when several members were denied visas for entry into the United States last year.
Pioneer Works, 159 Pioneer Street, Brooklyn, 7 p.m., $35/40

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