Morning Links

Morning Links: Monet’s Crew Edition

Édouard Manet, The Monet Family in Their Garden at Argenteuil, 1874.

COURTESY THE METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

L.A.

With all the action now wound down, check out ARTnews’s complete coverage from last week in Los Angeles, from the debut of Frieze and the liveliness of Felix L.A. to the legacy of ALAC and the spirit of Spring/Break. [ARTnews]

The L.A. Times has a photo essay on the “Faces of Frieze.” [Los Angeles Times]

Giants

Jasper Johns is the subject of a long profile. “I can’t say that my encounter with Johns did much to upend his reputation as an impenetrable figure. He had a remarkable ability to cut off a conversational thread with a single look. When asked if there were any younger artists he admired, he said, ‘Mmhmm.’ Asked for specific names, he responded with an unsmiling, ‘No.’ His speech was punctuated by long, powerful silences during which he stared out into the distance . . .” [T: The New York Times Style Magazine]

Karl Lagerfeld died at 85. [BBC]

Shows

An exhibition of new work by Japanese artist Takashi Murakami will be the focus of an annual Oscar bash at Gagosian Beverly Hills. [The Hollywood Reporter]

“Online music zine Pitchfork and the Art Institute of Chicago’s ambitious, collaborative music and art exhibition ‘Midwinter’ took over a number of the museum’s galleries and auditorium spaces from Friday to Sunday with the promise of interdisciplinary and genre-defying performances from artists including Slowdive, Laurie Anderson, Kamasi Washington, Yves Tumor, Deerhunter, Panda Bear, Zola Jesus, and more. Meanwhile, Monet, Van Gogh, and their crew were also on hand.” [Chicago Tribune]

The Guardian has a slideshow of striking pictures from an exhibition at the San Francisco Art Institute that surveys a controversial 1968 photo essay on the Black Panthers. [The Guardian]

Problems

The medical company Abbott Laboratories found what is believed to be a fake Marsden Hartley in a corporate collection dating back to the 1940s. [The Art Newspaper]

“US art photographer and activist Nan Goldin has declared she will refuse a prestigious retrospective of her work at Britain’s National Portrait Gallery if it accepts a gift of £1 million from a branch of the multibillionaire Sackler family made wealthy by addictive prescription painkillers.” [The Guardian]

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