Morning Links

Morning Links: Marcus Aurelius Edition

A bronze bust of Marcus Aurelius with a brass base. Made in Italy in the late 16th century, it currently resides in the collection of the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.

COURTESY METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

To receive Morning Links in your inbox every weekday, sign up for our Breakfast with ARTnews newsletter.

Museums

CNN took a look at how the Coral Springs Museum of Art in Florida became a “hub of healing” for those affected by the 2018 shooting at nearby Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School. [CNN]

Rujeko Hockley spoke about co-curating the Whitney Biennial, which arrives in May. [Columbia College Today]

The Hirshhorn Museum & Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C., has acquired a reconfigured version of Yayoi Kusama’s first Infinity Mirror Room. [The Art Newspaper]

Artists

Artist Natalie Frank is now represented by Salon 94 in New York. [ARTnews]

Liz Nowell has been named director of the Institute of Modern Art in Brisbane, Australia. [Artforum]

Hudson Yards

Landscape architect Thomas Woltz, who’s responsible for the public spaces at Hudson Yards in New York, talked about his art collection with Ted Loos. It includes a 17th-century French copy of a Roman bust of Marcus Aurelius. [The New York Times]

Critic Zachary Woolfe uses the opening of the Shed next month in Hudson Yards as an occasion to look at the state of cultural institutions, and funding, in New York. (Note: this article includes an absolutely stellar graphic about a few heavyweight organizations.) [The New York Times]

Markets

ARTnews Editor-in-Chief Sarah Douglas and Janelle Zara reported from the opening of Art Basel Hong Kong. [ARTnews]

Art-market ace Katya Kazakina and Suzanne Woolley took a look at “New York’s Baby Ivies, the private preschools and kindergartens where big money and bigger egos clash over whose three- or five-year-old will gain the first edge.” [Bloomberg]

And More!

The podcast 99% Invisible has a stemwinder about vandalism, conservation, and Barnett Newman’s Who’s Afraid of Red, Yellow and Blue III (1969–70), which is owned by the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam. [99% Invisible]

Here’s a primer on the genre of minimal ambient music known as lowercase. [Bandcamp Daily]

And here’s a look at “millennial disruption” in the home décor industry. One new brand is selling an “avocado toast” paint color. [The New York Times]

Copyright 2019, Art Media ARTNEWS, llc. 110 Greene Street, 2nd Fl., New York, N.Y. 10012. All rights reserved.