Event Horizon: Art Happenings Around New York

9 Art Events in New York This Week: ‘Art After Stonewall,’ Lorna Simpson, Frank Stella, and More

Peter Hujar, Daniel Ware (Cockette), 1971, gelatin silver print.

©1987 THE PETER HUJAR ARCHIVE LLC/COURTESY PACE/MACGILL GALLERY, NEW YORK AND FRAENKEL GALLERY, SAN FRANCISCO

TUESDAY, APRIL 23

Opening: “Art After Stonewall, 1969–1989” at Grey Art Gallery
Gathering more than 200 works at NYU’s Grey Art Gallery and the Leslie-Lohman Museum of Gay and Lesbian Art, “Art After Stonewall, 1969–1989” coincides with the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall rebellion that served as a flashpoint for generations of queer activism since. Organized in seven sections—among them “Coming Out,” “Gender and Body,” and “AIDS and Activism”—the survey examines the LGBTQ+ liberation movement’s far-reaching influence on visual culture. The exhibition includes works by Vaginal Davis, Nan Goldin, Barbara Hammer, Robert Mapplethorpe, Andy Warhol, and many others. It also served as the centerpiece of a roundtable discussion in the current queer-art-themed issue of ARTnews.
Grey Art Gallery, 100 Washington Square East, 6–8 p.m.

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 24

Opening: “The Portrait Is Political” at BRIC
A trio of exhibitions spotlights artists and subjects whose work focuses on marginalized communities in Brooklyn. In a presentation called “Jasmine Blooms at Night,” Jaishri Abichandani will show small paintings of South Asian American feminists. Texas Isaiah’s photographic explorations of gender, race, and sexuality will be on view in “Dear Los Angeles Love, Brooklyn.” And the third component is “The Other Is You: Brooklyn Queer Portraiture,” which will feature works in various mediums by 37 New York artists including Cristóbal Guerra, Melody Melamed, and Em Rooney.
BRIC, 647 Fulton Street, Brooklyn, 7–9 p.m.

Texas Isaiah, Fatima, 2018, digital photograph.

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THURSDAY, APRIL 25

Opening: Julie Curtiss at Anton Kern Gallery
Julie Curtiss’s latest exhibition, titled “Wildlife,” will showcase  dynamic and humorous paintings that take their cues from Chicago Imagism and typically feature surreal scenes engaged with desire and consumerism. Curtiss often draws inspiration from scenes she witnesses in New York City, wonders of the natural world, and notions of femininity. The centerpiece of the show, her largest painting to date, depicts a woman in an evening gown sitting on a toilet.
Anton Kern Gallery, 16 East 55th Street, 6–8 p.m.

Lorna Simpson, Submerged, 2018, ink and screenprint on gessoed fiberglass.

JAMES WANG/©LORNA SIMPSON/COURTESY THE ARTIST AND HAUSER & WIRTH

Opening: Lorna Simpson at Hauser & Wirth
Lorna Simpson, best-known for photographs that meditate on complex intersections of blackness and femininity, has tried her hand with a new medium: painting. Here she presents a selection of new large-scale paintings alongside recent photographic collages and sculptures in “Darkening,” her first exhibition at Hauser & Wirth since being added to the gallery’s roster. Figuring in the show are arctic landscapes—titled Darkening, Darkened, Submerged, and Blue Dark—rendered in black, gray, and blue tones. Other pieces blur the boundaries between abstraction and figuration and make use of textual fragments.
Hauser & Wirth, 548 West 22nd Street, 6–8 p.m.

Opening: Andy Warhol at Sperone Westwater
Curated by Vincent Fremont, one of the founders of the Andy Warhol Foundation (and former CEO of a holding company that once owned ARTnews), this show serves as the follow-up to a recent exhibition staged by Fremont and David Kratz at the New York Academy of Art. That exhibition focused on works on paper produced as late as the 1980s, while the second features 125 drawings made by Warhol in the ’50s and ’60s, with flowers, portraits, religious iconography, and travel imagery in the mix.
Sperone Westwater, 257 Bowery, 6–8 p.m.

Frank Stella, Leeuwarden II, 2017.

©2019 FRANK STELLA AND ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS)/COURTESY THE ARTIST AND MARIANNE BOESKY GALLERY, NEW YORK AND ASPEN

Opening: Frank Stella at Marianne Boesky Gallery
Frank Stella, the intrepid 82-year-old abstractionist whose work was the subject of a Whitney Museum retrospective in 2015, will debut new works at Marianne Boesky’s two New York spaces. Continuing his longstanding interest in geometric forms, the new pieces continue in the maximalist vein he has worked in for the past few decades. They split the difference between sculpture and painting, and pit gridded forms and curvaceous shapes against one another. One work in the show, Leeuwarden II (2017), features a colorful ribbon-like form snaking in and out of a fiberglass grid suspended within a metal frame.
Marianne Boesky, 507 and 509 West 24th Street, 6–8 p.m.

Performance: A Thousand Thoughts at the Town Hall
For a collaborative performance that hovers somewhere between a lecture, a concert, and a movie, filmmakers Sam Green and Joe Bini have joined forces with the string ensemble Kronos Quartet to create a piece that fuses live music, narration, and archival footage of artists including Terry Riley and Tanya Tagaq. On stage, the musicians will interface with the film, creating a live audio-visual hybrid that also serves as a history of late 20th- and early 21st-century music.
The Town Hall, 123 West 34rd Street, 7:30 p.m. Tickets $47

Wendy Red Star, Catalogue Number 1948.102 Parade Rider: Unidentified, 2019, pigment print on archival paper.

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SUNDAY, APRIL 28

Opening: Jean-Luc Moulène at SculptureCenter
For this show, the French artist Jean-Luc Moulène will debut a newly commissioned piece made in collaboration with engineers from Aerospace Valley, known as France’s answer to Silicon Valley. The work is the end result of a complex technical process that included a long set of design variables and an attempt to connect three objects: a sphere, a spiral staircase, and a knucklebone. Moulène has described the sculpture, titled More or Less Bone, as “a piece that is nothing but its own condition of existence.”
SculptureCenter, 44-19 Purves Street, Queens, 5–7 p.m.

Opening: Wendy Red Star at Sargent’s Daughters
For a recent exhibition of indigenous art at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, Wendy Red Star, an artist raised on an Apsáalooke (Crow) reservation in Montana, was asked to create wall text that would offer new histories for certain objects. Her latest show, “Accession,” features 15 prints derived from a residency at the Denver Art Museum, where she pored over card catalogues featuring watercolors and descriptions for Native objects in the collection. Relying on a similar style, she created works that overlay images of attendees at a Crow parade with drawings of items including blankets and beads.
Sargent’s Daughters, 179 East Broadway, 6–8 p.m.

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