Morning Links

Morning Links: $1.6 Billion Worth of Art Edition

Claude Monet, Meules, 1890.

COURTESY SOTHEBY’S

News

Arthur Jafa and Lithuania won the top prizes—the Golden Lions—for best artist and national exhibition, respectively, at the Venice Biennale, which opened to the public on Saturday. The Silver Lion for a “promising young artist” went to Haris Epaminonda. [ARTnews]

An activist involved with Decolonize This Place, a group staging “Nine Weeks of Art and Action” at the Whitney Museum to protest Warren B. Kanders’s role as vice chair of the institution, was arrested en route to last week’s intervention. [ARTnews]

Brooklyn’s Weeksville Heritage Center, a museum that was once home to hundreds of African-Americans before the Civil War, may be forced to shutter due to dwindling financial resources. Rob Fields, executive director of the nonprofit, said of the possible closure, “We would lose this repository of history, of black Brooklyn, of this inspiring example of what black people built in an age before emancipation.” [The New York Times]

Architecture

Architect David Adjaye has been selected to design the Kiran Nadar Museum of Art in New Delhi, India. The contemporary-art space will house a collection of some 6,000 works as well as a center for dance, music, and creative education. [The Art Newspaper]

Here’s a look at the multifarious proposals for rebuilding Notre-Dame’s spire, which include a 300-foot golden flame, a beam of light, and a stained glass roof, among other things. [The New York Times]

Market

See a preview of New York’s upcoming auctions this week. There is reportedly more than $1.6 billion worth of art—including works by Jeff Koons, Claude Monet, and Louise Bourgeois—is up for sale. [Bloomberg]

Artists

A deep dive into Lee Krasner’s life, career, and marriage to Jackson Pollock on the eve of the opening of a retrospective of her work at the Barbican Art Gallery in London. The artist’s nephew, dealer Jason McCoy, said, “She didn’t suffer fools. Her snappishness was enough to make one nervous. But I completely loved her.” [The Guardian]

The estate of Robert Indiana has filed notices in New York federal court to terminate licensing agreements for the late artist’s LOVE and HOPE works. [The Portland Press Herald]

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