Event Horizon: Art Happenings Around New York

9 Art Events to Attend in New York: Diedrick Brackens, Julie Becker, Regina Silveira, and More

Diedrick Brackens, unicorn kente, 2014, woven cotton, acrylic, and nylon yarn.

COURTESY THE ARTIST

TUESDAY, JUNE 4

Exhibition: Diedrick Brackens at New Museum
In his first institutional solo show in New York, Diedrick Brackens, who recently won Artadia’s inaugural Marciano Artadia Award and the Studio Museum’s $50,000 Wein Prize, will unveil a new installation of woven textiles in the New Museum’s lobby. To create his abstract and figural works, which often ruminate on black and queer identity, Brackens relies on the styles of various artistic traditions, including West African weaving, European tapestry-making, and quilting in the American South.
New Museum, 235 Bowery, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

Opening: “Entanglements: Before and After NAFTA” at International Studio & Curatorial Program
Against the backdrop of the U.S.’s current border policies and the recent renegotiation of the North American Free Trade Agreement, this exhibition examines economic exchange in North America. The 11 artists in the presentation address issues such as the drug and oil trades, changes in agricultural patterns and food sources, and resource extraction. Organized by ISCP’s resident curator Bárbara Perea Legorreta, the show features works by eight artists from Mexico, two from the U.S., and one from Canada. Among them are Alejandro Gómez Arias, Virginia Colwell, Roy Meuwissen, and Yoshua Okón.
International Studio & Curatorial Program, 1040 Metropolitan Avenue, Brooklyn, 6–8 p.m.

Regina Silveira, Model for “Supersonic Goal” (Pacaembu Stadium, São Paulo, Brazil), 2004, enamel, adhesive vinyl, paper, and wood.

COURTESY THE ARTIST AND ALEXANDER GRAY ASSOCIATES, NEW YORK

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 5

Opening: Regina Silveira at Alexander Gray Associates
Marking the 10th anniversary of Regina Silveira’s first solo show with Alexander Gray Associates, this exhibition brings together 10 unrealized site-specific installations and public projects by the Brazilian artist Regina Silveira. The drawings, models, and digital renderings in the show span three decades of her career, with works including Iluminada (2015), in which Silveira envisioned an animated labyrinth and digital waterfall cutting across a thoroughfare in Bogotá, Colombia, and Supersonic Goal (2004), which was originally planned for the Pacaembu Soccer Stadium in São Paulo.
Alexander Gray Associates, 510 West 26th Street, 6–8 p.m.

Opening: Fia Backström and Tahereh Fallehzadeh at Baxter St. at the Camera Club of New York
Titled “Against the Sun,” this two-person outing showcases work by the Iranian photographer Tahereh Fallehzadeh, whose work often explores notions of selfhood, and exhibition architecture by Swedish multidisciplinary artist Fia Backström. The show casts the two artists in a conversation about image-making, power, and authority during an age of political unrest.
Baxter St. at the Camera Club of New York, 126 Baxter Street, 6–8 p.m.

Nicole Eisenman, Procession, 2019, in the 2019 Whitney Biennial, Whitney Museum, New York.

MAXIMILÍANO DURÓN/ARTNEWS

THURSDAY, JUNE 6

Talk: “Curating the Whitney Biennial” at Whitney Museum
With the 79th edition of the Whitney Biennial currently on view, the exhibition’s co-curators, Rujeko Hockey and Jane Panetta, will join Whitney senior deputy director and chief curator Scott Rothkopf for a conversation about the show. Hockey and Panetta will detail the research and planning process that went into organizing the current Biennial and offer thoughts about the current state of American art.
Whitney Museum, 99 Gansevoort Street, 7 p.m. Tickets $8/$10

FRIDAY, JUNE 7

Opening: Mary T. Smith at Shrine
Starting in the late 1970s, the late Mississippi artist Mary T. Smith began creating paintings made on plywood, corrugated tin, or other recycled materials, often combining image and text for her pictures of daily life in the American South, biblical stories, and herself. Smith’s works in the storied tradition of Southern “yard show” paintings—art created by African-Americans on their properties, sometimes used to make clandestine social-political statements—will be represented by a selection of work from the ’80s and ’90s.
Shrine, 179 East Broadway, 6–8 p.m.

Mary T. Smith, Untitled (three red figures with blue on white), ca. 1980s, house paint and enamel on wood.

COURTESY THE ESTATE OF MARY T. SMITH AND SHRINE, NEW YORK

Opening: Ala Dehghan at Stellar Projects
This summer and fall, the Lower East Side venue Stellar Projects will host Sublimation, a program created by Brooklyn-based artist Nathan Story Freeman that, according to the project’s website, “fluctuates in and around the intersection of the chemical and the mystic.” For its second project, Sublimation has invited the interdisciplinary artist Ala Dehghan to create a site-specific installation, titled “Ultraviolet Realism,” that will include scrappy combinations of found imagery and abstractions.
Stellar Projects, 1 Rivington Street, 6 p.m.

SATURDAY, JUNE 8

Opening: “Resisting Paradise” at ApexArt
Organized by the San Juan-based curator Marina Reyes Franco, this group exhibition focuses on Jamaican and Dominican artists examining the effects of tourism, which they view as a modern means of perpetuating centuries-old forms of colonialism. Through a wide range of mediums and approaches, the artists touch on the collective narratives of slavery and exploitation in their native homes. On view will be work by Deborah Anzinger (whose work is currently being surveyed at the Institute of Contemporary Art Philadelphia), Leasho Johnson, and Joiri Minaya.
ApexArt, 291 Church Street, 7–10 p.m.

Julie Becker, Researchers, Residents, A Place to Rest (detail), 1993–96, mixed-media installation, installation view, at the Institute of Contemporary Arts, London, 2018.

MARK BLOWER/COURTESY GREENE NAFTALI, NEW YORK, ICA, LONDON, AND MOCA, LOS ANGELES

SUNDAY, JUNE 9

Exhibition: Julie Becker at MoMA PS1
For the first traveling museum survey dedicated to Julie Becker, the late Los Angeles–based artist’s installation Researchers, Residents, A Place to Rest (1996) will be erected in full. The piece was created while Becker was a student at CalArts, and it meticulously recreates architectural models of peculiar L.A. spaces—a real-estate office, a hallway dwelling—at much smaller scale. First presented last year at the Institute of Contemporary Arts in London, the exhibition has been expanded for PS1, where the show features more than 60 photographs, works on paper, video installations, and sculptures.
MoMA PS1, 22-25 Jackson Avenue, Queens, 12–6 p.m.

© 2019 ARTnews Media, LLC. All Rights Reserved. ARTnews® is registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.