Event Horizon: Art Happenings Around New York

9 Art Events to Attend This Week in New York: Tiona Nekkia McClodden, ‘Radical Love,’ Software Art, and More

Rodríguez Calero, Barrio Boogie Movement, 2006, collage. “Culture and the People.”

EL MUSEO DEL BARRIO, NEW YORK, ANONYMOUS GIFT

TUESDAY, JUNE 11

Exhibition: “Culture and the People: El Museo del Barrio, 1969–2019: Part II, Historic Timeline” at El Museo del Barrio
The second installment of El Museo del Barrio’s 50th-anniversary exhibition features a detailed timeline of the institution’s history since 1969. The show complements an exhibition of works from the museum’s holdings with materials including archival photographs, posters, invitations, publications, and other ephemera related to pivotal moments in the museum’s first five decades. As the community surrounding El Museo reflects on what the institution means—and ways it should change—the exhibition provides an opportunity to reflect on the museum’s past.
El Museo del Barrio, 1230 Fifth Avenue, 11 a.m.–6 p.m.

Opening: “Radical Love” at Ford Foundation Gallery
“Radical Love” is the second show in a trilogy of exhibitions focused on justice and the future curated by Jaishri Abichandani and Natasha Becker. This segment of the series will explore ways in which expressions of love—toward oneself, communities, and the planet as a whole—can help fix some of the world’s problems. Sculptures by Faith Ringgold and an installation by Thomas Lanigan-Schmidt will be on view alongside works by La Vaughn Belle, Maria Berrio, Nep Sidhu, Imani Uzuri, and more.
Ford Foundation Gallery, 320 East 43rd Street, 6–8 p.m.

Shirley Kaneda, Obscure Clarity, 2017, acrylic on canvas.

COURTESY THE ARTIST AND DC MOORE, NEW YORK

THURSDAY, JUNE 13

Opening: “The Unusual Suspects” at DC Moore Gallery
This show curated by the artist, critic, and Fordham University professor Richard Kalina (who has contributed to ARTnews) brings together abstract paintings by 21 contemporary artists including Amie Cunat, Federico Herrero, Carrie Moyer, Odili Donald Odita, and Stanley Whitney. The show meditates on the evolving and ever-changing nature of abstraction. A panel moderated by Kalina with four artists in the show will follow on Thursday, June 20.
DC Moore Gallery, 535 West 22nd Street, 6–8 p.m.

Opening: RongRong at the Walther Collection
In collaboration with the Three Shadows Photography Art Centre in Beijing, the Walther Collection is showing 40 photographs by the artist RongRong and the artistic community of Beijing East Village between 1993 and 1998. RongRong documented the prolific production of performance art by artists such as Ai Weiwei, Zhang Huan, and Ma Liuming, who transgressed social norms and, in some cases, fell prey to censorship. Images of artworks will be displayed alongside excerpts from RongRong’s diary.
The Walther Collection, 526 West 26th Street, 6–8 p.m.

Party: “Stonewall50 Celebration with Tiona Nekkia McClodden” at Whitney Museum
To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Stonewall uprising, the Whitney Museum will host an after-hours party featuring performances by artist Tiona Nekkia McClodden, whose work is currently on view in the Whitney Biennial, and several of her colleagues. The event will also include a viewing of the Biennial and music by DJ SHYBOI, and it will conclude with a walking tour highlighting the Meatpacking District’s queer history.
Whitney Museum, 99 Gansevoort Street, 7:30–9:30 p.m. Free with registration

 

FRIDAY, JUNE 14

Conference: “Software for Artists Day” at Pioneer Works
Now in its fifth iteration, Software for Artists Day is a two-day conference whose stated goal is to link together the worlds of art, technology, and activism through a series of talks and performances. For the event’s kick-off, there will be talks from artist Lauren Huret and engineer Francis Tseng. Highlights of Saturday’s programming include a talk from LaTurbo Avedon, who is described as an “avatar and artist originating in virtual space,” and a sound performance by Sarah Viviana Valdez.
Pioneer Works, 159 Pioneer Street, Brooklyn, 7 p.m. Tickets $25

Symposium: “Art After Culture?” at E-Flux
In celebration of two decades of the publishing and curatorial platform E-Flux, the organization has been staging a series of conferences under the title “Art After Culture?” For the fourth and final installment of the program (the first three were in Rotterdam, Paris, and Berlin), E-Flux will put on a two-day symposium featuring talks and events with artists including Hito Steyerl, Liam Gillick, and the Otolith Group. Parts of the conference will explore art’s function in the face of a growing global market and pending ecological and economic doom.
E-Flux, 311 East Broadway, 7–9 p.m.

Richard Pousette-Dart, Suspended Light, 1978, acrylic on linen.

COURTESY THE ESTATE OF RICHARD POUSETTE-DART AND MICHAEL ROSENFELD GALLERY, LLC

SATURDAY, JUNE 15

Exhibition: “Spiritual by Nature” at Michael Rosenfeld Gallery
This group exhibition focuses on art that draws on non-Western spirituality. The show features 16 artists, among them Yayoi Kusama, Norman Lewis, and Alma Thomas, and their work spans a variety of styles and mediums, including Fluxus-inspired installations and modernist abstraction. Six of the artists in the show have work in “Artistic License: Six Takes on the Guggenheim Collection,” an exhibition at the Guggenheim Museum featuring focused mini-shows curated by artists.
Michael Rosenfeld Gallery, 100 Eleventh Avenue, 10 a.m.–6 p.m.

Screening: Routine Pleasures and Negative Space at Metrograph
This program pairs two films dedicated to the late critic, artist, and professor Manny Farber, who was known equally for his film criticism and his still life paintings. (Some of the latter recently featured in a Museum of Contemporary Art Los Angeles survey that paid homage to Farber’s high-meets-low sensibility.) In Routine Pleasures (1986), the director Jean-Pierre Gorin, best known for his 1970s collaborations with Jean-Luc Godard, attempts to connect the traditions of model train enthusiasts to Farber’s paintings. In Negative Space, created almost a decade and a half after Routine Pleasures, the English novelist and filmmaker Chris Petit explores Farber’s work and the writings of art critic Dave Hickey.
Metrograph, 7 Ludlow Street, 5 p.m. Tickets $15

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