Morning Links

Ancient Egyptian Pyramids Reopen, How Notre-Dame Burned, New Jerry Saltz Book, and More: Morning Links from July 17, 2019

The “Bent Pyramid” in Egypt.

MOHAMED HOSSAM/EPA-EFE/SHUTTERSTOCK

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Changes

After a restoration project, Egypt has reopened the “Bent Pyramid” and its sister structure to the public. It’s the first time the pyramids have welcomed the public in decades. [Artnet News]

Culture workers across the country are clamoring for museums to stop offering unpaid internships. Some have alleged that these programs are accessible only to those who can afford them. [Hyperallergic]

Michelle Millar Fisher and the group Art + Museums Transparency have launched a survey through which respondents can discuss which institutions have offered unpaid internships. [ARTnews]

Threats

Take an in-depth look at how Notre-Dame burned—and how it was saved before it was destroyed completely. [The New York Times]

In May, the computers of the Asian Art Museum were attacked by hackers demanding a ransom. According to a museum representative, “everything is now fine,” and the ransom was never paid. [ABC7 News]

Movie producer Joey McFarland has been forced to hand over a Jean-Michel Basquiat drawing that was given to him by Jho Low, who formerly ranked on the ARTnews Top 200 Collectors list. McFarland claims to be unaware that the drawing was purchased using funds gained from Low’s theft of money from a Malaysian fund. [Bloomberg]

Artists

Jerry Saltz has expanded his award-winning article “How to Be an Artist” into a book, and it will be released by Riverhead in March 2020. [Artsy]

On View

In October, the British Museum in London will open a survey about Orientalism and its impact on the Middle East. [The Guardian]

Commercial Street gallery in Provincetown, Massachusetts, is showing whimsical works on paper by Candy Jernigan. See pictures of pieces in the exhibition. [ARTnews]

Food

Here’s why Wah Yee Tang Cake Shop began producing mooncakes—“edible works of art,” according to Claire Voon—to protest an extradition bill that would affect Hong Kong. [Atlas Obscura]

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