Morning Links

Kara Walker on Her Turbine Hall Show, Berkeley Museum Director Lawrence Rinder Will Depart, and More: Morning Links from September 24, 2019

Kara Walker.

ANDY KROPA/INVISION/AP/SHUTTERSTOCK

News

Bruce W. Ferguson, the first director of SITE Santa Fe and later head of the New York Academy of Arts and Otis College of Art and Design in Los Angeles, died at 73. [ARTnews]

Lawrence Rinder, director of the Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive in California, will step down after 13 years leading the institution. [ARTnews]

Ambition

Lonnie Bunch has a new book out: A Fool’s Errand: Creating the National Museum of African American History and Culture in the Age of Bush, Obama, and Trump. He discussed it from his newly assumed perch as secretary of the Smithsonian Institution. [Smithsonian Magazine]

In advance of her new commission for Tate Modern’s gigantic Turbine Hall, the Guardian paid a visit to Kara Walker in New York. “The Turbine Hall is like a grand prize,” she said. “You’ve been offered this gargantuan space and it’s all yours. It’s irresistible.” [The Guardian]

Art

Two shows by Danh Vo—at South London Gallery and Marian Goodman—get the review treatment from Guardian art critic Adrian Searle: “Everything connects. Things cleave apart and together. Vo sucks you in. What a wonderfully engaging, disarming and alarming artist he is. I cannot recommend his work enough.” [The Guardian]

Ben Enwonwu, one of Africa’s most famous artists, is gaining renewed attention, and his pieces are bringing big prices. [The New York Times]

“Pop art and identity politics spark Lucia Hierro’s Dallas show of uncommon depth.” [The Dallas Morning News]

A fisherman in Italy sank marble sculptures in the ocean to prohibit trawling by fellow fisherman and to lure scuba divers to a museum beneath the sea. Jason Horowitz: “His ‘House of Fish’ project is part environmental activism, part arts initiative, part marketing campaign, part bid for a lasting legacy.” [The New York Times]

The Paris Review has a selection of images of work from Amy Sherald’s much-heralded show at Hauser & Wirth in New York. [The Paris Review]

Misc.

Writing in the National Review, Daniel Gelernter does not much like the new Wangechi Mutu sculptures adorning the facade of the Met: “These sculptures are neither exceptional nor are they distressingly grotesque—but they are surpassingly ugly.” He adds: “From the statement of the artist, it does not appear aesthetic considerations impinged unduly on the design.” [The National Review]

There’s more reporting on the amorous relationship between actress Sienna Miller and Lucas Zwirner, the publications head for David Zwirner gallery. “It’s nice and settled and happy,” Miller said. Also: “I felt like I’d been in every room somehow and the art world is very new and fascinating, and very intellectual, which I love.” [Metro]

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