Morning Links

Pace Gallery Goes Big on Editorial, Little-Seen Ancient Sculptures Will Go on View, and More: Morning Links from October 29, 2019

The architectural rendering of Pace’s new home in New York.

COURTESY BONETTI/KOZERSKI ARCHITECTURE

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News

Pace Gallery is looking to grow its editorial offerings with a new senior director of content hired from rival Hauser & Wirth.
ARTnews

Controversy surrounds a gallery in the newly reopened MoMA named for Glenn Dubin, who has been accused of having ties to the late Jeffrey Epstein. Dubin has vigorously denied the allegations.
The New York Post

Margaret Carrigan: “A long-running lawsuit regarding damage to the cardboard frames on a triptych of Martin Kippenberger paintings has quietly come to a conclusion as a Los Angeles court rejected a nearly $100 million bad faith claim against the insurance company XL Specialty.”
The Art Newspaper

History

Read a survey of American museum directors whose reigns started before the young age of 40.
ARTnews

In time for Halloween, read up on artist Eric Oglander’s obsession with “the weird world of ‘haunted’ eBay.” To wit: “Oglander describes himself as a ‘collector of aesthetics,’ and his material is the ephemera of the world around us. For him, it is not the item on sale, but rather the listing itself which becomes the object.”
The New York Times

The Torlonia family assembled one of the world’s most important private collections of statuary—featuring “scores of busts and a veritable who’s who of classical mythology, dating from the fifth century B.C. to the fourth century A.D.”—and it will go on view for the first time in Rome before heading out on tour.
The New York Times

Artists

An interviewer for the Believer planned to talk to Marina Abramovic about art and life from the past. “But she thought my focus on the past was nostalgic in the pejorative sense, and found my questions about belonging excessive. Instead, she acted like the spiritual matron that she is, and pointed me in the direction of the stars, toward our cosmic DNA, into the now.”
The Believer

Sylvie McNamara writes that artist Emma Sulkowicz has been on “a listening tour of ideological positions that she’s always considered too right-wing to engage: centrists, conservatives, libertarians, and whatever Jordan Peterson is…” Part of the point is changing her posture. “Even if I disagree with this person,” she said, “it doesn’t have to piss me off.”
The Cut

On the occasion of the new book MoMA PS1, A History, Gothamist has a slideshow of images shot at the Queens kunsthalle, including a dance performance in 1977, Richard Nonas’s Alligator, and Cardi B.
Gothamist

Misc.

A concierge recalls flying from the U.S. to the Venice Biennale to personally deliver a new iPhone to a well-heeled client who had dropped hers in a canal.
Conde Nast Traveler

Cave paintings in Spain recently attributed to Neanderthals might not be as old as originally thought. “The latest volley in this debate … contends that rock art in three Spanish caves that had been dated to at least roughly 65,000 years ago may actually be tens of thousands of years younger. If so, then Stone Age humans could have created the painted symbols and hand outlines.”
Science News

Dean & DeLuca, the gourmet grocery store beloved for decades by many an epicurean artist on New York’s SoHo scene, is auctioning off the last remaining items in its store on Broadway and Prince Street.
Gothamist

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