Retrospective


Artists Retrospective
Michael Heizer, Altar 2 installation view, 2015, weathering steel, coated with polyurethane. ©THE ARTIST/PHOTOGRAPHER: ROBERT MCKEEVER/COURTESY GAGOSIAN GALLERY

‘There’s No Understanding of My Work’: Michael Heizer on His Monumental Art, in 1977

Michael Heizer is known for a body of work that relies on the beauty of his natural materials (rocks, dirt, land itself) and that often verges on near-comical grandiosity with its size and themes. With his latest show, “Altars,” at … Read More


Artists Retrospective
Installation view of Ellsworth Kelly at Matthew Marks Gallery. ©ELLSWORTH KELLY/COURTESY MATTHEW MARKS GALLERY

Converting Painting into Sculpture: William Rubin on Ellsworth Kelly’s Signature Style, in 1963

With four shows at Matthew Marks Gallery, Ellsworth Kelly is having one of the most exciting moments in his career at age 92. These shows find Kelly continuing his interest in blurring the line between painting and sculpture. His colorful … Read More


Retrospective
June 12, 1915.

Retrospective: The Unveiling of the Sistine Chapel Restoration

And other excerpts from our coverage 100, 75, 50, and 25 years ago Read More


Artists Retrospective Reviews

Before the Museum of Modern (F)art: On Yoko Ono’s First New York Show, in 1961

In honor of the Museum of Modern Art’s “Yoko Ono: One Woman Show, 1960–1971,” we turn back to Ono’s first exhibition ever, held at AG Gallery, which was run by George Maciunas and Almus Salcius, in New York, in July … Read More


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1971 COVER: Perhaps the greatest picture ever painted by a woman is the portrait of Charlotte du Val d’Ognes, ca. 1800, long attributed to the great Neo-Classic master J.-L. David, now considered to be by Constance-Marie Charpentier, who had worked in David's studio. It was purchased in 1917 for $200,000 and bequeathed the same year to the Metropolitan Museum by Isaac Dudley Fletcher.

From 1971: Editorial: Is Women’s Lib Medieval?

The following, published in ARTnews in January 1971, is a companion editorial to Linda Nochlin’s “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?” It is reproduced in connection with our coverage of Women in the Art World today.The vexing question … Read More


Retrospective ,
Lynda Benglis. VIA WIKIMEDIA COMMONS/COURTESY CHEIM & READ, NEW YORK

From 1971: Eight Artists Reply: Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?

The following, published in ARTnews in January 1971, are the eight artists’ replies to Linda Nochlin’s “Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?” It is reproduced in connection with our coverage of Women in the Art World today.Contents: Dialouge, … Read More


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From 1971: Sexual Art-Politics

Women are protesting the institutional and social barriers which handicap their careers, but in the arts, commerce seems to have played a more destructive role than prejudice
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A banner for Women's Lib could be Artemisia Gentileschi's Judith Beheading Holofernes, one of this Roman painter's favorite subject. This version dates ca. 1614–20, shortly after the scandal of her alleged promiscuous relations with her teacher. VIA WIKIPEDIA

From 1971: Why Have There Been No Great Women Artists?

Implications of the Women’s Lib movement for art history and for the contemporary art scene—or, silly questions deserve long answers; followed by eight replies Read More


Retrospective
May 15, 1915.

Retrospective: Philip Guston on Piero della Francesca

And other excerpts from our coverage 100, 75, 50, and 25 years ago Read More


Retrospective
A view of the new Whitney building from the West Side Highway, September 2014. ED LEDERMAN/COURTESY WHITNEY MUSEUM

The Artist-Built Museum: On the Whitney’s Opening, in 1931

Today, the Whitney Museum of American Art opens its doors in the Meatpacking District with “America Is Hard to See,” an exhibition of 600 pieces from the museum’s 21,000-work permanent collection. In honor of the much-anticipated opening of the new Whitney, … Read More


Artists Retrospective
Elaine de Kooning, John F. Kennedy, 1963, oil on canvas. ©1963 ELAINE DE KOONING TRUST/NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION

A President, Seen From Every Angle: Elaine de Kooning on Painting JFK, in 1964

In December 1964, a little over a year after one of America’s most beloved presidents was assassinated, Elaine de Kooning recounted painting John F. Kennedy in ARTnews. De Kooning (who had already written several articles for ARTnews, notably a few … Read More


Artists Profiles Retrospective
Trenton Doyle Hancock, To Get Ahead One Must Sacrifice Certain Freedoms, 2005, ink and acrylic on paper. COURTESY THE ARTIST AND THE STUDIO MUSEUM IN HARLEM

‘This Hamburger’s Got Legs’: Trenton Doyle Hancock as an Emerging Artist, in 2000

In honor of the Studio Museum in Harlem’s “Trenton Doyle Hancock: Skin and Bones, 20 Years of Drawing,” we turn back to 2000, when Hancock was still little-known in the art world. That year, his work was part of the … Read More


Retrospective
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Retrospective: Design as the Folk Art of the ’90s

And other excerpts from our coverage 100, 75, 50, and 25 years ago Read More


Retrospective
Diego Velázquez, detail of The Water Carrier of Seville, 1623, oil on canvas. WIKIMEDIA COMMONS

Secret Grandeur: Leo Steinberg on an Early Velázquez Masterpiece, in 1971

In the early 1970s, art historian and critic Leo Steinberg wrote a series of short articles for ARTnews about works he believed were masterpieces, mainly ones from the Renaissance and Baroque periods. (Steinberg was known for writing about Renaissance and … Read More