Tag Archives: Jacob Lawrence


Retrospective
Jacob Lawrence, Panel 58 of "The Migration Series": "In the North the Negro had better educational facilities," 1940–41, casein tempera on hardboard. ©2015 THE JACOB AND GWENDOLYN KNIGHT FOUNDATION, SEATTLE/ ARTISTS RIGHTS SOCIETY (ARS), NEW YORK/DIGITAL IMAGE ©THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART/LICENSED BY  SCALA/ART RESOURCE, NEW YORK

‘A Kaleidoscopic, Animated World’: A Review of Jacob Lawrence’s Early Work, From 1939

In 1941, Jacob Lawrence, only 23, made what would become his magnum opus—”The Migration Series,” a 60-work group of tempera paintings that chronicled life after the Great Migration, the movement of black Americans from the rural South to the urban North … Read More


Open Sesame: Art Events in New York
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9 Art Events To Attend in New York City This Week

Through Saturday, April 4 Read More


Profiles
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Rodney Miller: Bringing the Curators to His Own Living Room

African American and African diasporic art fills the Upper East Side townhouse of Studio Museum trustee Rodney Miller

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News
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The Changing Complex Profile of Black Abstract Painters

Long marginalized by their community and overlooked by the art market, African American abstractionists are finally coming into the spotlight Read More


Features
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The Artistic Influences that Made Artists Artists

Hank Willis Thomas, Pat Steir, Deborah Kass, and others reflect on their early encounters with art and the childhood experiences that shape their work Read More


News Web Exclusive
Boris Chaliapin, Julia Child, 1966, tempera on board. NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION; GIFT OF TIME MAGAZINE.

Catching up with Mr. Time

The National Portrait Gallery spotlights the work of Boris Chaliapin, who created hundreds of magazine covers in lightning speed Read More


Features
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‘I Will Never Look at Painting the Same Way Again’

Whether gaining observation skills by watching spiders or acquiring expertise in making ink from toast crumbs, artists say their most influential and inspiring teachers were those whose lessons went far beyond traditional instruction. Read More


Features
Matisse’s first show at MoMA opened its third season, in 1931. ©THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, NEW YORK

How Our Critics Spoke

The good, the bad, the splendid, the beautiful, and “a negation of everything under the sun and the sun itself”. Read More